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Michael Masters/Getty Images(SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif.) -- Controversy surrounds Milo Yiannopoulos' speech this evening at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, after the school was at the center of multiple racially charged incidents in recent weeks.

The Cal Poly College Republicans Club is hosting the "Fake News Panel" Thursday evening, which will include YouTube personalities Austin Fletcher and Carl Benjamin in addition to Yiannopoulos, said Matt Lazier, media relations director for the university.

A major police presence is expected at the sold-out event. In a statement, the university disassociated itself from the event, saying that it "is being presented by the club, not by the university."

"The university understands that the participants in the panel discussion are personalities that some members of our campus community may find offensive," said Lazier. "However, as a public university, Cal Poly is required to uphold free speech rights and provide an open forum for a variety of opinions, thoughts and ideas -- even those that may be distasteful or offensive."

Two of the university's professors expressed concern over Yiannopoulos' appearance in the current racially charged climate after photos emerged showing fraternity members in blackface and dressed as gang members, and racist posters were seen around campus. This is the second time Yiannopoulos has spoken at Cal Poly in less than two years, with his most recent appearance being January 2017.

Dr. Jose Navarro, an assistant professor in the university's ethnic studies department, told ABC News that he believes the sponsors of the panel event "implicitly endorse Yiannopoulos' Islamophobic, anti-feminist, alt-right and generally hateful positions."

"Indeed, it seems like the strategy of covert racists and bigots on campus to have such views disseminated by proxy," he said in an email to ABC News. "Inviting Milo to speak on campus, in short, is a way to get him to espouse the very ideas they believe without actually having to espouse those ideas publicly themselves, and then be held accountable by the campus community for their racism, bigotry and misogyny."

Dr. Neal MacDougall, a professor in the university's agribusiness department, called the club's decision to hold the panel at such a sensitive time "incredibly hurtful" and that it sends the message that "it really doesn't matter what students of color feel."

A Tribune Media report published last week found that Cal Poly has "the least racially diverse student population" among California's public universities. In 2017, 54.8 percent of the university's student body identified as white, which is the highest percentage of any public university in the state, according to the report.

Following the blackface incident, Cal Poly University President Jeffrey Armstrong said in a forum attended by nearly 1,000 students on April 12 that racism was not an issue at Cal Poly.

"I don't believe we have a culture that is racist," he said in the video, which was posted to the university's Facebook page. "I believe we have had some incidents that are awful and we are working very hard to get at the root cause and help people understand."

MacDougall said he "couldn't believe" the president's comments and added that Armstrong needs to address that "racism is a problem" at the university in order to improve the community in the long run.

"There is, in fact, a culture of racism of Cal Poly," MacDougall told ABC News.

Navarro said that while Armstrong deserves "some credit" for increasing the diversity of the student body, "nevertheless, the Cal Poly student body remains the whitest and wealthiest of any California public university."

"Simply put: if we do not create greater access to higher education for our major base of Californians (Latinos and other minorities), then they will not get high-wage jobs," he said. "The result of which will be that we will not be able to tax this base enough to replenish the coffers in the state that fund our universities and other public infrastructure."

The Cal Poly College Republicans did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.

Racially charged posters seen on campus

On the morning of April 17, MacDougall came into his office in the agribusiness department to find a multitude of racially charged messages, he said.

The first thing he said he noticed when he arrived was a university police officer standing in front of a men's bathroom. The officer instructed him to not use the last stall, he said. A maintenance worker later told him that someone had written the "N-word" on the wall, he said. A student of MacDougall's colleague snapped a photo of the graffiti before it was cleaned up, he added.

Later, MacDougall said he noticed that several racist posters had been put up on bulletin boards near his office, and messages of inclusion that were already there had been defaced.

Among the racist material was a flier with a bullet list referring to "species and subspecies," which purported to prove that people who are not white are "not human," he said. Maps were also posted that were said to show a "correlation" of a higher concentration of rape where there's darker people, such as Africa, as well as a higher rate of potential homicides where there are lower IQs, which also used darker skin tones as a factor, he said.

MacDougall snapped photos of the material and posted them to his Facebook page later that day. University police at first said they would send someone, but they never did, instead instructing MacDougall to take the posters down, he said.

In addition, messages of inclusion, including a sign that stated MacDougall was an "unafraid educator" who works "with and for undocumented students & families," were slashed.

Armstrong responded to findings, saying he was "disgusted to report that there have been a variety of inappropriate and hateful actions on campus in recent days, from slurs being directed at students, to offensive graffiti and postings in or on our facilities."

"These activities are the desperate work of a few who would seek to spread hate and divide us at a vulnerable time," he said. "Our strongest response in the face of this rhetoric is to come together as one with the common goal of eradicating hatred from our community."

Campus Greek life suspended over photos showing blackface

Armstrong has indefinitely suspended sororities and fraternities on campus as a result of photos surfacing showing a fraternity member in blackface and others dressed as gang members.

But Armstrong said he decided not to take action against individual students because it was their First Amendment right to express their views, he said in a video statement posted to Facebook.

Navarro said that he believes students and organizations who engage in "actions and speech that is severe or persistent enough to create a hostile environment for other students, staff and faculty based on race, color, religion, sex, gender, sexuality, age, etc., ought to be suspended or expelled."

"Indeed, I think the current issues related to free speech and the hostile environments they create raise an important constitutional question -- one that requires us to ask whether the right to free speech is greater than the right to equal protection and access to education," Navarro said.

Navarro said the students at Cal Poly are "unprepared for engaging in an incredibly diverse population" and that the university's lack of diversity will impress upon students an ignorance of diversity in the real world.

"If all Cal Poly students know about people different from themselves is filtered through stereotypes of these other people that are rendered on television or the internet, they might perform those same stereotypes in blackface or dressed up as Latino gang members," he said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(JESSUP, Pa.) -- A couple forced to deliver their fourth child at home with the help of a 911 dispatcher on the line recently got to meet the woman they deemed their "real-life hero."

On April 17, around 1 a.m., Tim Benedict of Jessup, Pennsylvania, called 911 to report that his wife, Arlee Benedict, was in labor. Their three children were asleep upstairs. He said he assumed that an ambulance would be on the way to take the couple to the hospital.

"It wasn't till a couple of minutes later that I realized that nobody was coming -- it was going to be me," he told ABC affiliate WNEP-TV on Wednesday.

According to WNEP-TV, the ambulance closest to the Benedicts' home had broken down.

As Arlee Benedict's labor progressed, 911 dispatcher Katlynn Aulisio stayed on the phone and talked Tim Benedict through the delivery. It was Aulisio's first time coaching a delivery over the phone.

"The baby's out! The baby's out!" Tim Benedict could be heard yelling on the 911 call. "She's crying! ... It's a girl!"

"OK, good! Congratulations, number one," Aulisio could be heard responding. "This is going to be a story to tell your friends."

On Wednesday, the Benedicts and baby Felicity traveled to the Lackawanna County 911 Center in Jessup to meet Aulisio. Aulisio said the visit meant a lot to her because 911 dispatchers don't often get to learn the outcomes of the calls they receive.

Tim Benedict told ABC News today that although the ordeal was "absolutely terrifying," having Aulisio on the phone was exactly what he needed.

"It helped me to be able to take care of my girls and deliver my baby," he said. "Honestly, meeting her yesterday was like meeting a real-life hero. ... We are so thankful and very relieved."

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Mark Makela/Getty Images(NORRISTOWN, Pa.) -- A Bill Cosby accuser who'd traveled from California to attend the weeks-long trial in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, told ABC News today that she was "elated" after hearing the guilty verdict.

"We [accusers] are finally believing in the system. The system is now working for us," Victoria Valentino said. "Women are being believed, finally, instead of the perpetrator, instead of the wealthy, powerful, famous perpetrators."

Valentino said that 48 years ago, in 1969, Cosby had drugged her with pills and raped her. She said that at the time, she had just turned 27 and was depressed after losing her 6-year-old son in a drowning.

Valentino said she never reported the incident with Cosby to authorities out of shame and humiliation.

Cosby, 80, was convicted in court today on three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault stemming from drugging and molesting a woman in his suburban Pennsylvania home nearly 14 years ago.

Andrea Constand, Cosby's main accuser, and five other women had testified that he'd drugged and sexually assaulted them. Cosby has steadfastly denied the charges.

Today's conviction came about 11 months after a mistrial was declared in Cosby's first trial. Valentino said she was also present for that trial.

Since the start of jury deliberations Wednesday, Valentino said that she and other accusers attending the trial had been "steeling" themselves for another mistrial.

"I didn't think they [the jurors] were going to come back this soon. I thought we were going to be here all day. ... I came back and all these crowds are out in front," she said. "You could feel the electricity in the air, and when they said verdict, oh my God, unbelievable, unbelievable."

Valentino said that although she never thought this day would ever come, it was important for her to attend the trial.

"Once you find your voice, there's no stopping you. ... The floodgates are open. ... It's not just about me anymore, it's about women," she said. "All of us, not just the Cosby survivors. ... It's about all women who still haven't found the courage to speak and they're holding their secret and holding their pain and holding their wounds into themselves and they're festering and it's infecting the next generation. ... So once you start speaking, I mean, it's just like flushing all the toxins out of your system and you just can't stop. You've got to see it through to the end."

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Mark Makela/Getty Images(NORRISTOWN, Pa.) -- After years of innuendo, allegations and ultimately two criminal trials -- the second of which ended with a guilty verdict Thursday -- Bill Cosby has been convicted on felony sexual assault charges.

The actor and entertainer -- known as "America's Dad" during the 1980s and beyond -- will be sentenced to go to prison later this year.

Here’s how prosecutors from Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, finally did it:

The prosecution team of District Attorney Kevin Steele and assistant district attorneys Kristen Feden and Stewart Ryan appear to have benefited from at least three key factors in which the first trial differed from the retrial.

Five additional accusers were allowed to testify in the retrial, versus one additional accuser in the first –- allowing the Commonwealth to demonstrate far more clearly what it has described as a decades-long pattern of alleged abuse by the defendant.

Prosecutors’ savvy use of an effective sexual assault expert as its first witness set the stage for the succession of claims that six women gave on the witness stand about being drugged and molested by Cosby.

The testimony of Dr. Barbara Ziv also seems to have helped inoculate those accounts from relentless attempts by the defense to discredit the women –- for coming forward years after the alleged incidents, for having sometimes hazy memories of the alleged attacks themselves, and for minor and major inconsistencies in their stories.

The retrial unfolded in the looming shadow of the #MeToo movement, a powerful and ubiquitous phrase that was virtually unknown during Cosby’s first trial.

Between the first hung jury and the start of the retrial, some of the biggest and most respected male stars in Hollywood, media and the arts were felled when multiple accusations of sexual harassment and assault drove them from their lofty perches into a new and devastating kind of public disgrace.

Finally, the prosecution appears to have benefitted from a gross miscalculation by the defense, which took a ferocious approach to impeaching both the women who testified and the #MeToo movement as a whole.

“The Most Important Ruling”

Prosecutors won a major pre-trial victory in March when Judge Steven T. O’Neill, who also oversaw the first case, ruled that five additional women with similar accounts to Andrea Constand -- that they were drugged and molested by Cosby -- could testify. In the first trial, he only allowed one additional accuser to testify.

Normally, prosecutors cannot introduce evidence of prior bad conduct from other cases because it could be prejudicial in the eyes of the jury. But Pennsylvania law allows for exceptions if such evidence establishes a modus operandi or common scheme to each alleged assault.

Prosecutors argued the need to demonstrate to the jury a specific pattern of behavior they believe underscores the similarities between nearly all of the dozens of accusers they interviewed and the account of Constand.

O’Neill had to weigh the value to the jury of hearing additional evidence from other accusers with similar stories against the prejudicial effect the new witnesses could have on the defendant.

Legal experts described O’Neill’s decision as a game-changer.

“It was the most important ruling in the first trial, and ... the most important ruling in the second trial,” Steve Fairlie, a former Montgomery County prosecutor, told ABC News.

In another new strategy employed in the retrial, prosecutors called as their first witness Dr. Barbara Ziv, an expert in sexual assault who outlined for jurors how the majority of sexual assault victims in the U.S. tend to display counter-intuitive behavior to other types of crime victims. It can be confused by observers and prompt them to doubt the victims’ stories, she said.

Ziv testified that the majority of victims in the U.S. fail to make timely reports, are often fuzzy on details and facts, often do not fight back, and are known to maintain contact with their attackers after the assault.

“Most of what people believe, the most common knowledge, about sexual assault is wrong,” she testified earlier this month.

Women don’t tend to report such attacks, she said, because “there’s shame involved, there’s a sense of culpability,” Ziv said from the stand. “It’s talking about the most private areas of their life. Women do not talk about sex, consensual sex, very often to very many people.”

That testimony appears to have inoculated jurors against defense attacks on the credibility of the additional five accusers.

Recognizing this, defense attorneys in closing arguments took #MeToo head-on in a blistering attack on both the movement, the additional accusers and Dr. Ziv. They banked on a backlash to the #MeToo movement against the abuse and sexual harassment of women, describing it as a mob mentality “based primarily on emotion and anger.”

“When you join a movement based primarily on emotion and anger, you don’t change a damn thing,” defense attorney Kathleen Bliss told jurors.

And one by one they took aim at the five additional accusers, especially former model Janice Dickinson, whom Bliss described as a “failed starlet” and an “aged-out model” and mused that it sounded “like she slept with every man on the planet.”

The Night Of...

One of the most striking and overlooked aspects of both trials is not what divided the prosecution's and defense attorneys' arguments, but rather the facts upon which they agreed.

Both sides stipulated that on a night sometime in or around early 2004, Constand visited Cosby at his suburban Philadelphia estate, that Cosby handed her three pills he referred to as “friends,” and that Constand ingested them.

Both sides agreed that Constand grew dizzy, uncomfortable and sleepy, and that Cosby led her to a couch and laid her down.

They also agreed that Cosby penetrated her with his fingers and used her hand to masturbate himself, and that afterward he left her on the couch and went upstairs to bed.

From there, the two sides diverge sharply.

Cosby’s attorneys described the incident as part of a consensual, if unorthodox, romantic relationship.

Prosecutors said the entertainer viciously drugged and incapacitated Constand before raping her and leaving her passed out on the couch with her bra around her neck and her clothes disheveled before heading upstairs to bed.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- More than 500 deputies in Florida have voted that they no longer have confidence in the sheriff who presided over the Valentine's Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 students and staff.

Jeff Bell, president of the Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, said Thursday that out of 628 votes, 534 Broward County deputies cast a ballot to say they "no longer have confidence" in Sheriff Scott Israel. Ninety-four people voted for Israel, Bell said.

The union called for the vote over sheriff's office's response to the Parkland shooting as well as Israel's response to the criticism of him in the wake of the shooting, ABC Fort Lauderdale affiliate WLPG reported.

"These members have displayed great courage to come forward and vote under the threat of retaliation," Bell said.

The association represents about 1,300 deputies and sergeants who "put their lives on the line every day," according to its president.

Bell said it is now time for the sheriff to start listening to both members of his office as well as the leaders of Broward County.

The association president took issue over Israel's leadership, policies and his handling of the budget. He also accused Israel of "taking care" of his family and friends by hiring them as "command staff at top levels" and attempting to "skirt the laws that are in place within the state of Florida."

"He fails to listen to the people," Bell said.

After the results of the vote were announced, Israel released a statement saying that he "will not be distracted" by the union vote.

"I am accountable to the citizens of Broward County," Israel said. "My job is to continue to do the job I was elected to do, which is to ensure the safety of Broward County’s 1.9 million residents."

In his statement, Israel repeated a sentiment he expressed while to reporters shortly before the results of the vote were announced, which is that the vote was "designed to extort a 6.5 percent pay raise from this agency."

Bell responded to Israel's comments by calling the sheriff a "complete liar."

"This has never been abut a contract," Bell said. "This has been about his longstanding policies."

Bell said that the only thing that he and Israel agree on is that on the day of the Parkland shooting, school resource deputy Scott Peterson "needed to go into the building to save more lives."

More than a week after the shooting, Israel announced that Peterson "did nothing" as he stayed outside the school as shots rang out for more than four minutes. However, Bell said Peterson wasn't a "coward" and merely "froze."

The association will be taking the issue up with lawmakers in Tallahassee, where they will ask Gov. Rick Scott to "do his job" and re-evaluate Israel's position within the sheriff's office, Bell said.

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ABC News (LOS ANGELES) -- The suspected "Golden State Killer," believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s, is now behind bars. The sudden arrest of 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo this week has shocked some of his victims and their family members, bringing their decades-old emotions back to the surface.

DeAngelo, a former police officer, was taken into custody on Tuesday at his home in Sacramento County, the same county where his alleged crime spree began in 1976. The crimes continued across the state until 1986.

His alleged "reign of terror" spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said at a news conference Wednesday.

Bruce Harrington, whose brother and sister-in-law were alleged victims of the "Golden State Killer" in 1980, said at the news conference: "[To the] ladies who were brutally raped in these crime scenes, sleep better tonight. He isn’t coming through the window. He’s now in jail and he’s history."

Here's a closer look at some of the victims.

In 1976, Jane Carson-Sandler was cuddling with her 3-year-old son in Citrus Heights, California, when a man with a butcher knife broke into her home and tied them up.

In 1977, 13-year-old Margaret Wardlow became the youngest victim of the "Golden State Killer" when she was tied up in her Sacramento home and raped, according to ABC affiliate KGTV in San Diego.

The attacker tied up Wardlow's mother and stacked plates on top of her so he would hear if she moved, KGTV said.

Wardlow, who had read articles about the "Golden State Killer," thought he seemed to thrive on his victims being powerless, KGTV said. So when he said to her, "Do you want to die? Do you want me to kill your mother?" Wardlow said she responded, "I don’t care," which she thinks saved her life, reported KGTV.

"Certainly I’m a victim. I was 13 years old, a man came into my home, tied up my mother and raped me. But I don’t own that," Wardlow told KGTV. "I can choose whether I own that or not, and I don’t own it.”

Wardlow said she will go to court appearances for the suspected "Golden State Killer," and said she wants to look him in the eyes and ask, "Why?"

Later, the crimes escalated to murder.

Brian and Katie Maggiore were the first murders victims of the "Golden State Killer." In February 1978, they were shot and killed while walking their dog in the Sacramento area.

Brian Maggiore was a 21-year-old sergeant in the Air Force and his wife, Katie Maggiore, was 20, according to The Mercury News.

Their deaths also marked the "Golden State Killer"'s final attack in the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department’s jurisdiction, according to The Sacramento Bee.

Another couple killed by the "Golden State Killer" was Lyman Smith, 43, and his wife, Charlene Smith, 33.

In 1980, they were killed in their Ventura, California, home. Charlene Smith was bound and sexually assaulted, The Ventura County Star reported.

"They were bludgeoned to death with a log that was from a stack of firewood they had outside their home," Lyman Smith's daughter, Jennifer Carole, told ABC station KGO in San Francisco.

Charlene Smith had been an interior decorator and Lyman Smith was on the short list for an appointment to the Superior Court bench, the Ventura County Star reported.

"I never in my lifetime expected to see [an arrest]," Carole told KGO.

Janelle Cruz, 18, believed to be the final victim of the "Golden State Killer," was raped and murdered in 1986 in Irvine, California.

Janelle Cruz was a "free spirit," with a "big heart," her sister, Michelle Cruz, said on "Good Morning America."

"She was the type of person that would stand up for you," Michelle Cruz said. "She was sort of my backbone."

But after she died, the family left Irvine and never returned, Michelle Cruz told ABC News on Wednesday.

Her sister's murder "completely changed my world, my life, my identity,” Michelle Cruz said.

"I kind of lived in sort of a bubble" for the first 20 years, Michelle Cruz said. "I never really talked about the case."

But she started talking about her sister's death more about eight years ago, she said, "hoping to spread awareness and solve the case."

She was always worried about her own safety, never staying home alone and barricading her windows and doors.

"I won't have to research this case for hours every day and miss out on my children and my family," she said. "I can finally breathe again."



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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images(NEW YORK)-- The parents of Otto Warmbier, the American college student who was imprisoned in North Korea for 17 months, have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against North Korea, charging that the regime tortured and killed their son.

The complaint filed Thursday in U.S. District Court states that "North Korea, which is a rogue regime, took Otto hostage for its own wrongful ends and brutally tortured and murdered him."

Warmbier died on June 19, 2017, at the age of 22, just six days after he was evacuated from North Korea in a coma. Doctors at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center examined him upon his return to Ohio and reported that he had severe brain damage and was in a state of unresponsive wakefulness.

He was arrested in North Korea in January 2016 for allegedly trying to steal a propaganda poster from a restricted area while visiting the country on a sightseeing tour. After a one-hour trial in March 2016, he was convicted and sentenced to 15 years of hard labor.

The lawsuit comes as President Donald Trump gears up for a potential summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un next month or in early June.

Fred Warmbier, Otto Warmbier's father, said in a statement that the lawsuit represents another step in holding North Korea responsible for their actions.

“Otto was taken hostage, kept as a prisoner for political purposes, used as a pawn and singled out for exceptionally harsh and brutal treatment by Kim Jong Un. Kim and his regime have portrayed themselves as innocent, while they intentionally destroyed our son’s life," Fred Warmbier said in a statement. "This lawsuit is another step in holding North Korea accountable for its barbaric treatment of Otto and our family.”

In a statement, the State Department said: “We extend our condolences to the Warmbier family. Out of respect for the Warmbier family, we have no further comment.”

Otto Warmbier's parents were guests of the president and first lady at the State of the Union, where Trump described the "depraved character" of the North Korean regime and pledged to "honor Otto's memory with American resolve."

Fred Wambier also attended the Olympic ceremonies in Pyeongchang, South Korea, as a special guest of Vice President Mike Pence.



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KOMO(GIG HARBOR, Wash.) -- A Washington state woman said she was determined to catch the "creeps" who recently burglarized her home and made off with electronics, jewelry, credit cards and even her family letters.

Instead of panicking after the robbery, Mavi McFarlane, 70, said she chose to investigate the crime herself and she got a big tip when she noticed that the thieves had used her credit card at local gas stations, including one right near her home in Gig Harbor.

"I was very upset. I felt sick to my stomach,” McFarlane told ABC affiliate KOMO on Wednesday. "I said, 'You know what? I’m going to catch these creeps.'"

"I'm going to get all the information in a package, and I'm going to give it to the police so they can go do their job," she added.

McFarlane said she immediately notified the gas station near her home, showing workers surveillance pictures of the suspects, with the hope that they might show up again -- and they did.

The suspects returned to the Gig Harbor gas station with another one of McFarlane's credit cards, and the clerk, already tipped off by the victim, recognized the suspects, pressed the store's panic button and hid one of the suspect's cell phones to stall them until police could arrive.

Luckily, the police showed up soon and arrested the two suspects, according to KOMO. Police said they found a variety of stolen credit cards, a gun, jewelry and illegal drugs all tucked away in the suspects' vehicle.

The 32-year-old and 27-year-old suspects were being held at the Pierce County Jail in eastern Washington on burglary charges. It wasn't clear yet if either had hired a lawyer.

As for the victim, she said she’s just happy that she was able to stop the alleged thieves.

"It felt so good to get these people off the streets,” McFarlane said. "They had stolen stuff in the car then that wasn't mine, but other people that they had robbed."

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Sacramento Police Department(LOS ANGELES) -- The suspected "Golden State Killer" who was arrested this week for killing and raping dozens of California residents decades ago, seemed shocked to find police outside his home, according to Sacramento County Sheriff's Department official Paul Belli.

Joseph James DeAngelo, a 72-year-old former police officer, was taken into custody on Tuesday at his home in Citrus Heights in Sacramento County, the same county where his alleged crime spree began in 1976. The crimes continued across the state until 1986.

DeAngelo lived at the home with family but was home alone when he was arrested, Belli told ABC News.

DeAngelo told police he had a roast in the oven, and officers said they could take care of it, Belli said.

He was placed under arrest without incident.

Colleen Fernandez, who lives in DeAngelo's neighborhood, told ABC News, "We walked by that house all the time ... but we never saw him."

"I'm just thankful he got caught," Fernandez said. "It's huge for this community. Even though it was 40 years ago, people still remembered."

Fernandez lived in the Sacramento area during the years of the "Golden State Killer" crime spree, calling it "a scary time."

"I was just a young woman. It was frightening. You'd definitely lock your doors and your windows," she said. "You had buddy system. I worked at a restaurant -- I made sure somebody walked me to my car."

Another neighbor, Robin Brown, noticed the police tape at DeAngelo's home but figured he was getting his driveway repaved.

"We've always felt safe in this neighborhood," she said.

DeAngelo is believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s.

His alleged "reign of terror" spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday.

Today, investigators will conduct a methodical, room-by-room search of his home, Belli said.

Authorities have a list of items stolen from victims' homes as well as other items connected to crimes, including weapons.

DeAngelo was a police officer in Exeter, California, from 1973 to 1976, officials said.

In 1976 he served as a police officer in the city of Auburn until he was fired in 1979 for allegedly stealing a hammer and a can of dog repellent, The Associated Press reported, citing Auburn Journal articles from the time.

DeAngelo then spent 27 years working for Save Mart Supermarkets at a distribution center in Roseville, near Sacramento, said Victoria Castro, a public affairs manager for Save Mart. He retired last year.

"None of his actions in the workplace would have lead us to suspect any connection to crimes being attributed to him," Castro said in a statement. "We are working with the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office on their investigation."

Last week, DeAngelo's name came up for the first time in the "Golden State Killer" investigation, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.

DeAngelo was then surveilled and DNA from an item police had collected of his was confirmed as a match.

He has not yet appeared in court.

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ABCNews.com(MYRTLE BEACH, S.C) -- Surveillance video from the Avista Resort in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, captured the near drowning of a 12-year-old boy who was playing in a lazy river.

Hotel security footage from the March 19 incident shows two boys fidgeting with an underwater grate in an attempt to expose the suction pipe below. One boy can be seen repeatedly diving into the water to explore what lies underneath the grate when his leg suddenly becomes lodged between the 6-inch wide pipe.

Trapped underwater, the boy’s friend tries to free him. After an unsuccessful attempt he calls for help and bystanders rush to help free the boy. One man was able to administer underwater mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to keep the boy alive until authorities arrived.

According to a police report, North Myrtle Beach Police responded to the scene around 10 p.m. Emergency responders can be seen diving into the pool and eventually freeing the boy from his entrapment and dragging him out of the water. The video shows a female officer vigorously pounding on the boy’s chest to keep his heart beating before he is carried away on a stretcher. The boy was underwater for 9 minutes.

Once EMS personnel were able to revive the boy he was taken to Grand Strand Medical Center for further treatment, authorities said.

North Myrtle Beach public information officer Patrick Dowling told ABC News the boy's family does not want his identity to be released.

Further details on the boy’s condition is unknown at this time.

No charges have been filed against the resort and no criminal misconduct was found, Dowling said.

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- More than 1.4 million public school students were missing classes today as tens of thousands teachers in Arizona and Colorado walked out in a powerful display of frustration over a decade of education funding cuts they say have piled up to billions of dollars.

Arizona teachers went on strike after voting overwhelmingly last week to take the drastic move in hopes it will pressure lawmakers into giving them a 20 percent pay hike, fork over a $1 billion in education funding and up the salaries of school support staff.

Public educators in Arizona rank 46th in the nation in teacher pay, earning about $12,000 less than the national average of $59,660, according to a 2018 report by the National Education Association.

In Colorado, up to 10,000 educators have taken personal leave to rally at their state Capitol in Denver today and tomorrow and lobby legislators to boost funding for education there, which they say has been slashed by a whopping $6.6 billion over the last nine years. The teachers are also demanding no new corporate tax breaks until education funding is restored.

"We are fed up at this point," Kerrie Dallman, president of the Colorado Education Association, told ABC News this week.

The Arizona and Colorado teacher labor actions are just the latest in a wave of educator revolts ignited by West Virginia teachers who went on a nine-day strike earlier this year and won a five percent pay raise in March.

Since the West Virginia wildcat strike, teachers in Oklahoma went on a nine-day strike of their own, persuading legislators to up their annual pay an average of $6,000, give support staff a raise and increase funding for education by nearly $500 million. Earlier this month, Kentucky educators walked out of class angry over a pension reform bill they said was passed by legislators without their input and signed into law by their governor despite their vociferous objections.

Most of the work actions have occurred in red states where legislatures and governors' offices are dominated by Republicans. Colorado, where Democrats occupy the governor's office and hold a majority in the state Assembly, is the exception.

More than 30 school districts in Arizona canceled classes today and may be forced to do the same in days to come as 30,000 to 50,000 striking teachers formed picket lines and threatened to stay out of school for as long as it takes to get lawmakers to meet their demands.

An estimated 840,000 public school students in Arizona are missing classes after numerous school district shut down schools because they couldn't find enough substitute teachers to fill in. The same problem occurred in Colorado, where classes were called off for an estimated 600,000 students.

"We have a fight in front of us," Joe Thomas, president of the Arizona Education Association, told teachers during a rally on Wednesday. "And we want the parents to understand that this fight is for your child. How it ends is up to the governor and up to those legislative leaders."

Republican Gov. Doug Ducey has already proposed boosting teacher pay 20 percent by 2020, but educators are concerned over how he plans to pay for it. They say their protest is more than just a paycheck issue and want lawmakers to restore $1 billion in lost funding for education since the national 2008 financial crisis.

"Without a doubt, teachers are some of the biggest difference-makers in the lives of Arizona children," Ducey said in a Twitter post this morning. "They need to be respected, and rewarded, for the work they do -- and Arizona can do better on this front.

"We’ve all been listening -- but now, it's time to act," Ducey added. "My number one focus right now is passing a 20% pay raise for Arizona teachers. This raise is earned, and it is deserved... To parents, I understand the pain & pressure caused by today’s strike. I'm working to get this 20% raise passed."

In Colorado, teachers wearing #RedforEd T-shirts and toting signs reading "Make Education Great Again" and "Can You Hear Us Now" swarmed the state Capitol Denver.

"We're here today because of our students," Amie Baca-Oehlert, a high school counselor and vice president of the Colorado Education Association, told ABC News outside the Capitol building. "They certainly deserve better. We have one of the fastest growing economies in the country. We need to do better for our students."

The teachers say Colorado spends about $2,700 less than the national per-pupil average of about $12,000 a year.

According to the National Education Association report, Colorado teachers' pay ranked 31st in the nation. Colorado teachers earn an average of $53,768 annually or about $6,500 below the national average.

"We have teachers working two to three jobs," Baca-Oehlert said. "We have school districts where they've cut mental health supports like counselors, social workers, psychologists. They've cut art, music, PE (physical education)."



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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- The suspected "Golden State Killer" behind serial rapes and murders across California in the 1970s and 1980s has finally been identified.

Joseph James DeAngelo, a 72-year-old former police officer, was arrested this week in the decades-old case.

His alleged "reign of terror" spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday. DeAngelo is believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries.

Here is a closer look at the timeline:

1973-1976

DeAngelo was a police officer in Exeter, California, from 1973 to 1976, officials said.

1976-1979

DeAngelo was then a police officer in Auburn from 1976 to 1979 until he was fired for allegedly stealing a hammer and a can of dog repellent, The Associated Press reported, citing Auburn Journal articles from the time.

1976-1978

The terror started with burglaries and rapes in the eastern district of Sacramento County in the summer of 1976, the FBI said.

The "Golden State Killer" would break into his victims' homes by prying open a window or door while they slept, the FBI said.

Sometimes he would take jewelry, identification, cash and coins from the victims' homes.

There were five incidents in 1976 and 17 incidents in 1977, according to SFGate.

1978-1981

The crimes turned to murders in February 1978, when the "Golden State Killer" shot and killed Brian and Katie Maggiore, who were walking their dog in the Sacramento area.

They were the killer's last victims in the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department’s jurisdiction, according to The Sacramento Bee.

After the attacks in the Sacramento area, crimes continued in the East Bay area of Northern California, and then escalated into rapes and murders along the California coast, the FBI said.

1986

No crimes were attributed to the "Golden State Killer" from July 1981 until 1986, when 18-year-old Janelle Cruz was raped and murdered in Irvine.

That was his last known crime.

2018

Last week, DeAngelo's name came up for the first time in the investigation, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.

DeAngelo was then surveilled and DNA from an item police had collected of his was confirmed as a match.

"We had our man," Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones said at a news conference Wednesday.

On Tuesday afternoon, DeAngelo was confronted by officers and arrested in Citrus Heights in Sacramento County, said Jones.

He has not yet appeared in court.



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(NORRISTOWN, PA) -- At the age of 80, Bill Cosby was convicted today on three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault stemming from drugging and molesting a woman in his suburban Pennsylvania home 14 years ago.

As the verdict was read just before 2 p.m. in the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pennsylvania, Cosby leaned his head down, took a deep breath and appeared to close his eyes.

Cosby's main accuser, Andrea Constand, and two other women who say Cosby also drugged and sexually assaulted them were in the courtroom and burst into tears as the verdict was announced.

"I feel like my faith in humanity has been restored," one of the women, Lili Bernard, said after hearing the verdict. "I stand here in the spirit of Martin Luther King, who said that the arch of the moral universe is long but today it has bent towards justice.

"Today, this jury has shown what the #MeTo movement is saying, that women are worthy of being believed," she said. "And I thank the jury, I think the prosecution."

The conviction came about 11 months after a mistrial was declared in Cosby's first trial when a jury failed to reach a verdict.

The jury of seven men and five women began deliberating Wednesday and spent a little over 12 hours going over evidence presented to them over the last two weeks before rendering their unanimous decision.

"Andrea Constand came here to Norristown for justice and that is what 12 jurors from Montgomery County provided her," Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele said during a post-verdict news conference. "We have shown from our record that money and power or who you are will not stop us from a criminal investigation or prosecuting a case."

Steele, who prosecuted the case with assistant district attorneys Kristen Feden and Stewart Ryan, added that the investigation unmasked Cosby as "a man who has spent decades preying on women that he drugged and sexually assaulted."

Steele said he will move to get Cosby, a multimillionaire, to pay for not only the cost of this trial but the previous one as well. He noted that lead defense attorney Tom Mesereau said in his opening argument that the $3.38 million Cosby paid in 2005 to settle a sexual assault lawsuit filed against him by Constand was a "paltry sum."

"So clearly the cost of prosecution in this matter should not be a problem for the defendant," Steele said.

As Steel spoke, Constand stood stoically nearby but did not make a statement to reporters.

"He used his celebrity, he used his wealth, he used his network of supporters to help him conceal his crimes," Steele said. "And now we really know today who was behind that act, who the real Bill Cosby was and a jury has spoken with one voice in a court of law and found the defendant guilty of drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand in his Elkins Park home."

After the verdict was announced, Steele asked Judge Steven O'Neill to revoke Cosby's bail and send him to jail right away.

"I understand this is very serious ... however, to ask to revoke the bail of an individual ... [what] is your concern?" O'Neill asked Steele.

"Flight," Steele said. "To any place. He has a plane."

At that point, Cosby screamed out in a booming voice: "He doesn't have a plane, you a------!"

Judge O'Neill ordered Cosby to surrender his passport but ruled he can remain free on $1 million bail until his sentencing sometime in the next 60 to 90 days. He faces up to 30 years in prison.

Asked later by reporters what he thought about Cosby's courtroom outburst, Steele said, "Well, I guess you got to see a brief view of who he was."

Mesereau said Cosby will appeal the conviction.

"We are very disappointed by the verdict," Mesereau told reporters outside the courthouse. "We don't think Mr. Cosby is guilty of anything and the fight is not over."

Mesereau and the Cosby defense team had banked on a backlash to the #MeToo movement against the abuse and sexual harassment of women, describing it as a mob mentality “based primarily on emotion and anger.”

Attorney Gloria Allred blasted the defense team for attempting to undercut the credibility Cosby's accusers by portraying them as liars out to frame the comedian. During the trial, Mesereau called Constand a "pathological liar" and a "con artist."

"Tom Mesereau, you tried and failed," Allred told reporters outside the courthouse. "Bill Cosby, I have three words for you: Guilty! Guilty! Guilty!"

Cosby declined to speak to reporters as he left the courthouse. He pumped his right fist in the air as a small crowd of supporters gathered nearby encouraged him to stay strong. He stuck his hand out the window of a black sport utility vehicle and waved at supporters as he was driven away.

Cosby was convicted of charges connected to the assault on Constand, 44, a former director of operations for the women’s basketball team at Temple University, where Cosby was a trustee and major financial donor. Constand testified that Cosby gave her a powerful drug that rendered her dizzy, weak and unable to defend herself as he sexually assaulted her in 2004 at his home.

The prosecution was also allowed to call five other women to testify that Cosby assaulted them in the same manner.

While Constand didn't publically speak about the verdict, her attorney, Dolores Troiani, said, "The person who I think needs to be heralded for what she has done is Andrea."

"She came here 14 years ago for justice. I am so happy today that I can say that although justice was delayed, it was not denied," Troiani said. "It took a lot of courage for her to come back and to do this."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A woman who police say carried out a calculated plan to kill her husband's mistress brought a trove of items with her including binoculars and ammunition.

Jennair Gerardot, 47, of Wilmington, Delaware, knew about her husband's affair with 33-year-old Meredith Chapman of Pennsylvania, according to Radnor Township Police.

Gerardot rented a car about two weeks ago in Wilmington and on Monday drove near Chapman's house in Radnor Township, a Philadelphia suburb, and parked on a side street, police said.

Gerardot broke into Chapman's house and waited for her to come home, police said. As soon as Chapman walked in the door, Gerardot shot her in the head, police said.

Gerardot then turned the gun on herself, shooting herself in the head, according to police.

Found inside Gerardot's rental car were binoculars, ammunition, rubber gloves and earplugs, police said, and emails and texts indicated Gerardot's attack was pre-meditated.

 Jennair Gerardot's husband, Mark Gerardot, was in the driveway when officers arrived at the scene. He told them, "My wife may be inside," police said.

Police said they believe Mark Gerardot was in the area because he had planned to meet Chapman for dinner, and when she didn't arrive, he became concerned and went to her house.

 Mark Gerardot worked for the University of Delaware from November 2017 to April 2018 and he left the university earlier this month, University of Delaware spokeswoman Andrea Boyle Tippett said.

Chapman worked at the University of Delaware from 2010 to March 2018, Tippett said. She also received her bachelor's degree from the University of Delaware in 2007 and her master's from the university in 2015.

 "Everyone who knew and worked with Meredith is heartbroken," Tippett told ABC News via email. "As a proud alumna of UD, her commitment to her work was exceeded only by her boundless energy. She believed earnestly in the power of communication to bring people together, whether to achieve their collective goals or simply to share their stories. We will miss her."

Chapman also worked as an assistant vice president of marketing and creative services at Villanova University and ran for the state senate in Delaware in 2016.

A former student remembered Chapman as a mentor and role model.

"She was a vibrant and engaging teacher who went out of her way to help grow the communications careers of students at the university -- young women in particular," the student told ABC News via email.

"During her 2016 run for district senate a group of students, including myself, helped to support her campaign and she let us know that working with her UD students motivated her to be a better professor and advocate for a stronger education system and job opportunities for the next generation," the student said. "Even though she lost the election, Professor Chapman accepted her loss with grace and utilized it as a teaching moment to inspire us all to take risks and pursue our passions no matter the odds."

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ABC News(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- The sister of a "Golden State Killer" victim "can finally breathe again" after a suspect’s arrest in the decades-old serial killing and rape case in California, she told ABC News.

"We finally got the guy who brutally raped and murdered my sister," Michelle Cruz, a sister of victim Janelle Cruz, told ABC News Wednesday of the accused man.

Janelle Cruz died in 1986 in Irvine, California.

The arrest is "surreal" and "unbelievable," Michelle Cruz added on "Good Morning America" today.

"I'm so thankful this journey is finally over," she said. "And I can rest and go to bed at night, and rest easier knowing that he's in jail and he'll never walk free again."

The "Golden State Killer" is believed to have killed at least 12 people, raped at least 50 people and committed multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s in crime sprees throughout California.

His "reign of terror," Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday, spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California.

The suspected serial killer, Joseph James DeAngelo, was surprised when he was confronted by officers and arrested Tuesday afternoon in Citrus Heights in Sacramento County, Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones said.

DeAngelo, 72, was a police officer until 1979, officials said.

His name had never come up in the investigation before last week, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.

It was discarded DNA that confirmed, "We had our man," Jones said at a news conference Wednesday.

After Janelle died, Michelle Cruz said, their family left Irvine and never returned.

Her sister's murder "completely changed my world, my life, my identity,” she said.

"I kind of lived in sort of a bubble" for the first 20 years, Michelle Cruz said Wednesday. "I never really talked about the case."

But she started talking about her sister's death more about eight years ago, Cruz said, "hoping to spread awareness and solve the case."

She was always worried about her own safety, never staying home alone and barricading her windows and doors.

"I won't have to research this case for hours every day and miss out on my children and my family," she said. "I can finally breathe again."

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