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iStock/Marilyn Nieves(CHICAGO) -- Grim new details have emerged about the murder of a pregnant teenager whose baby was cut from her womb, as prosecutors described how the teen was lured by a Facebook ad for free baby clothes and her accused killer claimed the baby as her own.

"Words really cannot express how disgusting and thoroughly disturbing these allegations are," Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said at a news conference.

Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, 19, was 9 months pregnant when she was killed and she is survived by a 3-year-old child. Her baby is in grave condition at a hospital with no brain activity, according to prosecutors.

Prosecutors in Chicago have charged Clarisa Figueroa, 46, and her daughter Desiree Figueroa, 24, with the murder. At the news conference, they detailed what they say happened in excruciating detail.

They allege that Clarisa Figueroa posted an offer of free baby clothes on a Facebook page called "Help a Mother Out," which they described as a group that offers access to baby items for "families in need," and that Ochoa-Lopez responded to the post and arranged to meet Figueroa at her Chicago-area home.

Desiree Figueroa is alleged to have distracted Ochoa-Lopez with a photo album of Clarisa Figueroa's dead adult son so that Clarisa Figueroa could strangle the teen with a cable.

At one point, Ochoa-Lopez was able to slip her fingers between her neck and the cable, keeping herself from being strangled, and, according to Murphy, this prompted the elder Figueroa to yell at her daughter, "you're not doing your f------ job!"

"Defendant Desiree then stepped up and began to peel the victim's fingers from the cable one by one," Assistant State's Attorney James Murphy told reporters.

Clarisa and Desiree Figueroa have been charged with murder, while Clarisa Figueroa's 40-year-old boyfriend Piotr Bobak has been charged with helping to cover up the alleged crime. All three appeared in Cook County Court Friday and were denied release on bail.

Julie Contreras, the spokeswoman for Ochoa-Lopez's family, said that the family is asking for "justice for Marlen."

"Today is a sad day. Today is a day of anguish that this family is living through. A nightmare, a horror film," Contreras told reporters at court.

Murphy said that following Ochoa-Lopez's murder, Clarisa Figueroa brought the baby to a nearby hospital, where it was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Clarisa Figueroa then allegedly formed a GoFundMe page in an effort to raise money for the baby, who she was passing off as her own.

Bobak shared a link to the fundraiser on his Facebook page, Murphy said.

When police arrived at Figueroa's house on May 14 to execute a search warrant, police reportedly saw Bobak cleaning a rug with bleach.

Police later found Ochoa-Lopez's body in a trash can on the property. Investigators believe the murder took place on April 23.

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Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) - Rashema Melson is no stranger to adversity. The 23-year-old, who had lived for three years in a Washington, D.C. shelter, made headlines as the valedictorian of Anacostia High School’s Class of 2014 with a full scholarship to Georgetown University.

On Saturday, Melson graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in justice and peace studies -- the first person in her family to graduate from college. Her next steps are a job at a service organization in D.C. and law school, she told ABC affiliate WJLA-TV.

Melson spoke with ABC News last week, sharing her path to graduation and some of the hardships she endured throughout her life.

She grew up in southeast D.C., bouncing between public housing and homelessness, living in the infamous D.C. General Family Shelter -- the notoriously-troubled mega-shelter which closed last October.

She even, at one point, lived in an abandoned house. Melson said she used to wake up to the sting of bed bug bites, constantly changed schools and ate food straight from the can because there were no plates.

“My life has always been rough,” Melson told ABC News. “Homeless or not, in Southeast, it’s rough, regardless," she explained. "The circumstances are just rough due to the fact that we don’t have the tools or resources as everyone else.”

Reading and education helped Melson focus and imagine a different life for herself, and the support of her friends motivated her to finish her studies. She left Georgetown after her freshman year to get married, and when the marriage didn't work out, it was her friends who successfully urged her to return to Georgetown and complete her degree.

To people going through difficult situations, her advice is that things always get better in time.

"Just know that your blessing is there waiting for you, you just have to go get it," she said.

Melson told ABC News that she hopes someday that Americans will be able to entertain a more expansive view of homelessness.

“How do you know that I am homeless? Because, am I supposed to look dirty? Am I supposed to stink? What does that mean?” she wondered aloud.

“It’s not offensive when people do it but you really can’t tell anything from looking at a person.”

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Portland Police Bureau(NEW YORK) -- The "hero" football coach who disarmed an alleged gunman at an Oregon high school said Saturday he "put his life on the line" for his students because he didn't have "any other choice but to act."

Keanon Lowe, who coaches football and track and field at Parkrose High School, wrestled the alleged gunman, Angel Granados Dias, 18, to the ground when police say the suspect brought a weapon on campus Friday afternoon.

"When I signed up to be a Security Guard, Football and Track & Field Coach for Parkrose High School, I did so to guide and coach young people whose shoes I had once been in," he tweeted Saturday. "I had no idea, that I would one day have to put my life on the line like I did yesterday for my students."

Lowe said when Granados Dias allegedly went to the school and put his students in danger, there was no option but to try to stop him.

"When confronted with the test the universe presented me with, I didn't see any other choice but to act," he continued in the tweet. "Thank God, I passed."

No one was injured in the Friday afternoon scare, police said.

"I'm blessed to be alive and extremely happy that the students are safe," Lowe tweeted.

Officers apprehended Granados Dias and recovered the weapon he allegedly brought to the school. He was charged with possession of firearm in a public building, attempting to discharge a firearm at a school, reckless endangerment, and possession of a loaded firearm in a public place, police said.

Students told ABC affiliate KATU-TV that Lowe, formerly a star wide receiver with the University of Oregon Ducks, saved the day.

"He's a hero," one student told KATU on Friday.

A police sergeant said the shooting threat ended with the "best-case scenario."

"The staff members from all accounts did an excellent job," said Portland Police Sergeant Brad Yakots.

Police said the investigation was ongoing.

But Lowe said the experience has been a blur, and has made him reflect on life and gun violence in schools.

"I've spent the last 24 hours being more appreciative of my family and realizing we have a serious problem," he said.

"I'm not sure what's next, I haven't had the time to really think about it," he added. "But I am sure I want to be a part of the solution to school gun violence."

I'm blessed to be alive and extremely happy that the students are safe. I'm not sure what's next, I haven't had the time to really think about it. But I am sure I want to be a part of the solution to school gun violence. Thank you @PortlandPolice for your help #ParkroseHighSchool

— Keanon Lowe (@KeanonLowe) May 18, 2019

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KTRK-TV(HOUSTON) -- The mother of a four-year-old Houston girl who has been missing for two weeks says she hopes her child is still alive, even as suspicion mounts that her ex-fiance might have had a role in the girl's murder.

"As a mother, I want to hope that she is (still alive)," Brittany Autumn Bowens, 26, told ABC station KTRK-TV in Houston. Her daughter, Maleah Davis, has been missing since May 3. "I'm devastated. This is my daughter, that I carried."

Last Saturday, Texas prosecutors charged Derion Vence, 26, Bowens' former fiance who was living with the family when Maleah disappeared, with tampering with evidence. In setting bail at $1 million, the Texas judge noted that Davis had recently suffered a brain injury and undergone surgery while in Vence and Bowens' care.

Surveillance footage shows Maleah and Vence walking into the family's apartment on April 30 -- the same day that Bowens left town for her father's funeral -- and after that, Maleah was not seen again, according to KTRK-TV. Additional surveillance footage from a neighbor shows Vence leaving the couple's apartment on May 3 with his son and a laundry basket.

Later, police found a laundry basket in Bowens' car and cadaver-sniffing dogs detected the scent of human remains in the car.

Prosecutors also said that police found blood in the apartment that matched Davis's DNA.

During Vence's court appearance, prosecutors detailed what Vence had told police about the little girl's disappearance.

Vence said that he left the apartment on May 3 with Maleah and his son in Bowens' Nissan Altima.

When he stopped to check the car's tires, Vence told police, he was carjacked, assaulted and kidnapped by a group of people he described as Hispanic men. Vence said that when he regained consciousness, his son was with him but Bowens' daughter was not. He said a good Samaritan then drove him to the hospital, according to prosecutors.

Bowen told KTRK that she had been away from home to bury her deceased father, and had returned to find out that her daughter had disappeared.

"How did I get to this place?" Bowens said through sobs.

When asked why she had left Davis with Vence, she said, "Because I trusted him."

"I am a good mother. I'm hurting just like everybody else and I want answers too," Bowens said.

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iStock(NEW YORK) -- A NYPD officer allegedly paid her boyfriend $7,000 to help her hire a hit man to murder her estranged husband and the boyfriend's teen daughter, according to court records.

But the boyfriend turned out to be cooperating with authorities, and following a dramatic law enforcement ruse in which the cop was shown a picture on Friday morning of her husband appearing to be dead in his car, she allegedly began discussing her alibi with the boyfriend in case she was questioned, according to court records.

The boyfriend was wearing a recording device, according to authorities, and the entire conversation was captured on audio and video.

That's when investigators from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the New York Police Department (NYPD) moved in and arrested her.

Officer Valerie Cincinelli, 34, of Oceanside in Nassau County on Long Island, was charged with conspiracy to commit murder and held without bail following a hearing late Friday afternoon.

Prosecutors argued in a detention memo filed in court on Friday that "the evidence in this case is overwhelming."

"The defendant was captured on audio and video recording planning the murders, and, once she was advised that the murder of John Doe was effected, she was captured on audio and video planning her alibi and destroying evidence of her involvement in the crime."

Cincinelli, who has been on the job since 2007, had been on modified assignment since 2017 because of prior domestic incidents involving the boyfriend and the estranged husband, law enforcement sources said.

In the memo, prosecutors noted that Cincinelli's first husband obtained a restraining order against her in 2014, that both she and her estranged husband have existing restraining orders against each other, and that she had a "volatile history" with the boyfriend -- who tipped off authorities to the alleged murder plot.

Cincinelli first approached the boyfriend about having her estranged husband -- and his teen daughter -- murdered in February, and continued discussions with him in person and on the phone, according to court records.

The boyfriend told her he knew someone who would commit the murders for $7,000, which he would convert into gold coins to pay off the hit man. Cincinelli allegedly withdrew the $7,000 in cash from a Long Island bank in February, court records show. He then used the money to purchase five ounces of gold coins, according to authorities. The murders were supposed to take place last weekend, officials said in court records.

The estranged husband was to be murdered near his office on Long Island, and Cincinelli and the boyfriend allegedly discussed how the killing "would not look suspicious because the murder would take place in 'the hood' or 'the ghetto,'" according to court records.

At one point, according to court records, Cincinelli seemed to become anxious about why the boyfriend's teen daughter had not yet been killed. After the boyfriend allegedly informed her that the hit man would not commit the murder near the child's school.

"OK, so she leaves school, you said he knows exactly where she lives, right?" Cincinelli is alleged to have asked him. "So what's the problem?"

At another point she allegedly told the boyfriend to tell the hit man to “run her the [expletive] over, how about that."

On Friday morning around 10 a.m., Suffolk County police arrived at Cincinelli's home to notify her that her estranged husband had been murdered -- but it was all part of an FBI-orchestrated ruse.

"Then, almost immediately after the Detective left the home, Cincinelli began to discuss...her alibi -- specifically what she would tell the police if she were to be questioned about the death," prosecutors wrote in a detention memo filed on Friday.

Then, at 10:48 a.m., according to court records, an FBI agent posing as the hit man texted a picture of the husband, appearing to be dead in his car, to the boyfriend. Along with the picture, the agent texted a demand for another $3,000 in order to carry the murder of the boyfriend’s minor daughter, identified in court papers as “Jane Doe.”

"In response, Cincinelli instructed the [confidential informant] to delete the text messages and photographs, citing her fear that law enforcement could subpoena the phone," prosecutors wrote.

The identity of the boyfriend was not disclosed in court papers, and it remains unclear how he first came into contact with the NYPD.

The target of the alleged attack -- Isaiah Carvalho Jr., according to his attorney Matt Weiss -- only learned of the purported plot on Friday.

"He found out today, just like everybody else," Weiss told ABC News.

Weiss said that his client is grateful to law enforcement officials and that "all things considered, he sounds OK."

Carvalho Jr. sued her for divorce in Nassau County, according to court records cited by the New York Post, and a trial was set to begin next month.

Weiss issued a statement late on Friday saying his client is "still in shock."

"At the outset, Mr. Carvalho would like to thank law enforcement for all of their diligent efforts," Weiss said in the statement. "Mr. Carvalho is still in shock and is attempting to process the events, which have transpired over the past 24 hours. At this time, Mr. Carvalho and his family would appreciate the press honoring their privacy."

It was not immediately clear whether Cincinelli had retained a defense attorney. She was represented in court on Friday by a federal public defender, who could not immediately be reached. The New York Police Benevolent Association, which represents New York police officers, did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

Cincinelli's father told ABC News that his daughter was being set up by the boyfriend, whom he declined to identify.

In a telephone interview as he drove north from his home in Virginia to New York City to try and assist his incarcerated daughter, Louis Cincinelli said the boyfriend had once accused her of pulling a gun on him and threatening his life, only to allegedly recant that accusation in criminal court in New York

"I don't know what happened but I do know my daughter and i knew this was not true when I first heard it. She was going out with some wacko pathological liar who had her locked up once before, saying that she pulled a gun on him and threatened to kill him, but then he went to court and said in open court, he recanted it and said he had made it up. Now ... she throws this bum out again and two weeks later this happens."

"But she's the biggest idiot for being with him," he continued. "I don't know. I don't understand these kids. But I know my daughter. She wouldn't do this. She's a domestic violence officer, and she knows that that's not the way to handle something like this, to knock somebody off."

Cincinelli worked as a domestic violence officer in the 106th Precinct in Queens, according to the NYPD, but had been working on the modified duty since 2017 in a unit that monitors video surveillance cameras at city housing projects.

"I guarantee you," the distraught father continued, "the bottom line is going to be that it turns out she didn't do this."

The FBI and the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau brought the case against Cincinelli.

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iStock(CANAAN, N.H.) -- On a Thursday in March, when a New Hampshire high school student wanted lunch but had forgotten to bring money to school, a lunch lady named Bonnie Kimball told him not to worry about it. He could bring the money the next day.

“I just told him, ‘Have your mom send in some money tomorrow,’” Kimball told ABC News, adding that she “had no doubt he would pay for his meal the next day.”

And, sure enough, the next day “he brought the money in at 7:30 in the morning ... and paid his account in full,” Kimball said.

But it didn't end there.

Later that day, the district manager of Fresh Picks, the food services company that employed Kimball, informed her that she had committed "theft" and was out of a job.

Now, Fresh Picks appears to be offering Kimball her job back -- but it's not clear that she wants it.

As Kimball spoke to ABC News, the school district’s superintendent Amanda Isabelle released a statement saying that after she had spoken with Fresh Picks and the company had agreed to reinstate Kimball with back-pay.

"The events of these past few weeks and the feedback I have received from parents has given me considerable pause," Isabelle said in the statement. "As a school district, we understand the importance of rules and procedures, but upon reflection, I have become sufficiently convinced that it is wrong of us to assume that all the responsibility falls to the vendor, and I do not believe our communities would accept that explanation of this situation. We must be accountable for the people who work in our schools."

It was not clear that the company had reached out to Kimball directly with a job offer.

“I’m not bailing them out, I’m not gonna do it,” Kimball told ABC affiliate WMUR-TV.

While she has kind words for her experience at the Canaan, New Hampshire, high school, Kimball was less enthusiastic about Fresh Picks.

The school should bring on another vendor -- one “that will treat the children better,” she said.

“They’ll never have another kitchen crew like we were. We made those lunches with love. We weren’t just lunch ladies,” she told ABC News. “We went above and beyond our job and made sure the kids got what they wanted and how they liked it.”

In fact, Kimball has said that two other employees in the Mascoma lunchroom quit to protest her termination.

A termination letter provided to ABC News by Kimball said that she was fired for violating cash handling procedures and school and federal policies.

“On March 28, a District Manager was on-site and witnessed a student coming through the line with multiple food items that you did not charge him for,” the letter said. “This in strict violation of our Cash Handling Procedures, the Schools Charge Policy and Federal Regulation governing free meals. Your final pay will be processed and disbursed to you.”

But the district manager was standing right next to her when she gave the student the free lunch, Kimball said, and called the way her termination was handled “unprofessional.”

Kimball, who worked for Fresh Picks for four-and-a-half years, spoke about how much she misses her students.

“I miss all the kids,” she said. “I still stay in touch with a lot of them. I stop by the school and I go to sports events, but it’s not the same as being with them every day.”

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A major severe weather outbreak got underway on Friday across parts of the Plains with 31 reported tornadoes in four states (Nebraska, Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas). The majority of these tornadoes came from western Kansas and Nebraska -- creating some incredible images of large funnels in the western prairies.

The severe weather threat will expand eastward through the rest of the Plains Saturday and into parts of the Midwest and Northeast on Sunday. The next concern is a major severe weather risk targeting the Southern Plains on Monday.

Typically, the second half of May into early June can be quite violent for severe weather in the central U.S.

There is a new tornado watch Saturday morning for parts of Texas and Oklahoma, including San Angelo, Abilene and Wichita Falls. This tornado watch will go expire at 10 a.m. Central time. Storms in this region are likely to become severe, with a couple of tornadoes, damaging winds and large hail all possible.

Action will continue throughout the day, expanding east and north as moisture begins to interact with a strong system moving through the Central Plains. Numerous severe storms will fire up from Texas to southern Minnesota on Saturday, with the entire region will be at risk for tornadoes, destructive winds and large hail.

There is an enhanced risk across northeast Texas and into parts of Louisiana and Arkansas, including the metro areas of Dallas, Shreveport, Louisiana; and Little Rock, Arkansas. In the enhanced risk region there is a chance for strong tornadoes and destructive winds. It is important to note that destructive, straight-line winds can still be extremely dangerous and cause major damage.

On Sunday, this system will move into parts of the Midwest, and storms will begin to crop up from Illinois to western New Jersey.

Thunderstorms will move into the Midwest on Sunday afternoon and evening.

There is a slight risk for severe weather in this region, including Chicago, Indianapolis, Detroit and Cleveland. Damaging winds and large hail will be the primary threats. While the tornado risk should remain limited, brief tornadoes cannot be ruled out.

All of this severe weather activity is a prelude to a dramatic ramping up on Monday when the next impulse comes off the Rocky Mountains into the Southern Plains. A major severe weather event will likely occur on Monday -- and the severe weather will likely last into the middle of the week.

There is a moderate risk and enhanced risk for severe weather in parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas on Monday. This includes some areas that are well known for particularly violent weather in late May, including Oklahoma City and Woodward, Oklahoma and Wichita and Wichita Falls, Kansas.

Unfortunately it appears all the ingredients will come together on Monday for strong tornadoes, perhaps violent and on a long track, in the region. These type of severe weather events usually unfold in the late afternoon and evening hours.

Additionally, the severe weather this weekend and the next round of severe weather coming Monday and lasting into the middle of next week will have the potential to drop torrential rain through much of the central U.S.

Locally, over 6 inches of rain is coming to parts of the central U.S. over the next few weeks, which could cause flash flooding. Many spots across parts of the region -- including the Upper Midwest -- have very saturated ground from a snowy winter, and heavy rains already this spring. Therefore, flash flooding and river flooding will become a significant concern through the coming week.

Also, robust, supercell thunderstorms can drop torrential rain, obscure tornadoes and cause major life-threatening flooding. There is a potential for activity like this in parts of the Plains over the coming days.

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iStock(PORTLAND, Maine) -- A teacher in Maine has filed a lawsuit against her former school district, saying she was terminated over taking breaks to pump breast milk and breastfeed her newborn child.

Shana Swenson, of Portland, was let go by Falmouth Elementary School at the end of the 2017-2018 school year and she says it was part of a year-long campaign to remove her after she returned from maternity leave and took three breaks per day to pump breast milk.

Falmouth Public Schools denied the claim, with an attorney for the school telling the Bangor Daily News Swenson's allegations are "false."

"Falmouth works hard to support employees who are parents by, among other things, providing mothers with paid time to breast feed and express breast milk during the school day, extended parental leave when needed, and an on-site day care for employees so that they are able to be near their children and participate in their care during the working day," lawyer Melissa Hewey told the Bangor Daily News.

Swenson began working for the school district in 2015 as a Response to Intervention teacher for grades 3 to 5, assisting kids who were struggling in classes.

She taught through the 2016-2017 school year until leaving to give birth to her son in February 2017, according to the lawsuit, which was filed in U.S. District Court last week. She was on maternity leave through August, but returned to school for the 2017-2018 academic year.

She spoke to the school's principal, Gloria Noyes, and said she planned to pump or nurse during "scheduled and approved breaks." Swenson said during the day she took three breaks, approximately every two to three hours, and they lasted about 20 minutes each.

"Shortly after distributing the aforesaid group schedule to her team, Plaintiff was approached by Ms. Noyes and asked if she could reduce the amount of times she needed to express breast milk throughout the work day from three times per day to two times per day and for her to take said breaks during her lunch and planning time (rather than at the times her body required it)," according to the lawsuit.

It was at this point she alleges Noyes began to slowly force her out.

The lawsuit also states that Swenson became the target of "extreme animosity and hostility" by coworkers over her decision to take breaks to pump. She offered to try to be "flexible" with the breaks, but said she was legally allowed to take the breaks in accordance with the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Maine Human Rights Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act, according to the lawsuit.

The criticism from colleagues caused her to "break down emotionally" and undergo "stress-related physical symptoms," the lawsuit states.

Swenson brought her concerns to Noyes once and the criticism did not stop, she said, before again sitting down with Noyes in October 2017. Noyes promised to conduct an investigation, but she never spoke to Swenson about the allegations and her coworkers said Swenson's "performance and communication were allegedly lacking," according to the suit.

The teacher had received only positive performance reviews up until this point in her career, but she was then put on an "Action Plan" to improve her behavior.

"Following the November 3, 2017 performance review meeting, Ms. Noyes' and other management began to create a paper trail on Plaintiff as a way to expedite her imminent termination," the lawsuit reads.

By the following April, she was told that her contract was not being recommended for renewal and on May 11 officially received a letter from her union representative saying she would not be brought back in the fall.

Noyes did, however, provide a positive letter of recommendation for Swenson after being terminated, the lawsuit says.

Swenson is requesting payment for lost wages and court fees in a jury trial. The school district said it plans to fight the case in court.

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iStock/Graffizone(NEW YORK) -- A New York Police Department officer allegedly paid her boyfriend $7,000 to help her hire a hit man to murder her ex-husband and his young daughter, according to court records.

But the boyfriend turned out to be cooperating with authorities, and following a dramatic law enforcement hoax in which the cop was shown a picture on Friday morning of her ex-husband appearing to be dead in his car, she allegedly began discussing her alibi with the boyfriend in case she was questioned, according to court records.

The boyfriend was wearing a recording device, according to authorities, and captured the entire conversation on tape.

That's when agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the NYPD moved in and arrested her.

Officer Valerie Cincinelli, 34, of Oceanside in Nassau County on Long Island, was charged with conspiracy to commit murder and held without bail following a hearing late Friday afternoon.

Cincinelli, who has been on the job since 2007, worked out of the NYPD's 106th Precinct in Queens. However, she has been on modified assignment since 2017 because of prior domestic incidents involving the boyfriend and the ex-husband, the sources said.

Cincinelli first approached the boyfriend about having her ex-husband murdered in February, and continued discussions with him in person and on the phone, according to court records.

The boyfriend told her he knew someone who would commit the murder for $7,000, which he would convert into gold coins to pay off the hit man. Cincinelli allegedly withdrew the $7,000 in cash from a Long Island bank in February, court records show. The murders were supposed to take place last weekend, officials said in court records.

The ex-husband was to be murdered near his office on Long Island, and Cincinelli and the boyfriend allegedly discussed how the killing "would not look suspicious because the murder would take place in 'the hood' or 'the ghetto,'" according to court records.

At one point, according to court records, Cincinelli seemed to become anxious about why the child had not yet been killed. After the boyfriend allegedly informed her that the hit man had located the child in New Jersey, Cincinelli allegedly asked him "why wasn't it done," to which he is said to have replied that the hit man would not commit the murder near the child's school.

"OK, so she leaves school, you said he knows exactly where she lives, right?" Cincinelli is alleged to have asked him. "So what's the problem?"

At another point she allegedly told the boyfriend to tell the hit man “run her the [expletive] over, how about that."

On Friday morning around 10 a.m., police arrived at Cincinelli's home to notify her that her ex-husband had been murdered -- but it was all part of an FBI ruse.

"Then, almost immediately after the Detective left the home, Cincinelli began to discuss...her alibi -- specifically what she would tell the police if she were to be questioned about the death," prosecutors wrote in a detention memo filed on Friday.

Then, at 10:48 a.m, according to court records, an FBI agent posing as the hit man texted a picture of the ex-husband, appearing to be dead in his car, to the boyfriend. Along with the picture, the agent texted a demand for another $3,000 in order to carry the murder of the boyfriend’s minor daughter, identified in court papers as “Jane Doe.”

"In response, Cincinelli instructed the [confidential informant] to delete the text messages and photographs, citing her fear that law enforcement could subpoena the phone," prosecutors wrote.

The identity of the boyfriend was not disclosed in court papers, and it remains unclear how he first came into contact with the NYPD as an informant.

The target of the alleged attack -- Isaiah Carvalho Jr., according to his attorney Matt Weiss -- only learned of the purported plot on Friday.

"He found out today, just like everybody else," Weiss told ABC News.

Weiss said that his client is grateful to law enforcement officials and that "all things considered, he sounds OK."

Carvalho Jr. sued her for divorce in Nassau County, according to court records cited by the New York Post, and a trial was set to begin next month.

Weiss issued a statement late on Friday saying his client is "still in shock."

"At the outset, Mr. Carvalho would like to thank law enforcement for all of their diligent efforts," Weiss said in the statement. "Mr. Carvalho is still in shock and is attempting to process the events, which have transpired over the past 24 hours. At this time, Mr. Carvalho and his family would appreciate the press honoring their privacy."

It was not immediately clear whether Cincinelli had retained a defense attorney. She was represented by an attorney from Nassau County's Legal Aid Society, but attempts to reach the attorney were not immediately successful. The New York Police Benevolent Association, which represents NYPD officers, did not immediately respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

Cincinelli's father told ABC News that his daughter was being set up by the boyfriend, whom he declined to identify.

In a telephone interview as he drove north from Virginia to New York City to try and assist his incarcerated daughter, Louis Cincinelli said the boyfriend had once accused her of pulling a gun on him and threatening his life, only to allegedly recant that accusation in criminal court in New York

"I don't know what happened but I do know my daughter and i knew this was not true when I first heard it. She was going out with some wacko pathological liar who had her locked up once before, saying that she pulled a gun on him and threatened to kill him, but then he went to court and said in open court, he recanted it and said he had made it up. Now, a year later, she throws this bum out again and two weeks later this happens."

"But she's the biggest idiot for being with him," he continued. "I don't know. I don't understand these kids. But I know my daughter. She wouldn't do this. She's a domestic violence officer, and she knows that that's not the way to handle something like this, to knock somebody off."

According to the NYPD, Cincinelli had been on modified duty since 2017 and was working in a unit that monitored video surveillance cameras at city housing projects.

"I guarantee you," the distraught father continued, "the bottom line is going to be that it turns out she didn't do this."

The FBI and the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau brought the case against Cincinelli.

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iStock/Pattanaphong Khuankaew(CHICAGO) -- Grim new details have emerged about the murder of a pregnant teenager whose baby was cut from her womb, as prosecutors described how the teen was lured by a Facebook ad for free baby clothes and her accused killer claimed the baby as her own.

"Words really cannot express how disgusting and thoroughly disturbing these allegations are," Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said at a news conference.

Grim new details have emerged about the murder of a pregnant teenager whose baby was cut from her womb, as prosecutors described how the teen was lured by a Facebook ad for free baby clothes and her accused killer claimed the baby as her own.

"Words really cannot express how disgusting and thoroughly disturbing these allegations are," Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said at a news conference.

Prosecutors in Chicago have charged Clarisa Figueroa, 46, and her daughter Desiree Figueroa, 24, with the murder. At the news conference, they detailed what they say happened in excruciating detail.

They allege that Clarisa Figueroa posted an offer of free baby clothes on a Facebook page called "Help a Mother Out," which they described as a group that offers access to baby items for "families in need," and that Ochoa-Lopez responded to the post and arranged to meet Figueroa at her Chicago-area home.

Desiree Figueroa is alleged to have distracted Ochoa-Lopez with a photo album of Clarisa Figueroa's dead adult son so that Clarisa Figueroa could strangle the teen with a cable.

At one point, Ochoa-Lopez was able to slip her fingers between her neck and the cable, keeping herself from being strangled, and, according to Murphy, this prompted the elder Figueroa to yell at her daughter, "you're not doing your f------ job!"

"Defendant Desiree then stepped up and began to peel the victim's fingers from the cable one by one," Assistant State's Attorney James Murphy told reporters.

Clarisa and Desiree Figueroa have been charged with murder, while Clarisa Figueroa's 40-year-old boyfriend Piotr Bobak has been charged with helping to cover up the alleged crime. All three appeared in Cook County Court Friday and were denied release on bail.

Julie Contreras, the spokeswoman for Ochoa-Lopez's family, said that the family is asking for "justice for Marlen."

"Today is a sad day. Today is a day of anguish that this family is living through. A nightmare, a horror film," Contreras told reporters at court.

Murphy said that following Ochoa-Lopez's murder, Clarisa Figueroa brought the baby to a nearby hospital, where it was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Clarisa Figueroa then allegedly formed a GoFundMe page in an effort to raise money for the baby, who she was passing off as her own.

Bobak shared a link to the fundraiser on his Facebook page, Murphy said.

When police arrived at Figueroa's house on May 14 to execute a search warrant, police reportedly saw Bobak cleaning a rug with bleach.

Police later found Ochoa-Lopez's body in a trash can on the property. Investigators believe the murder took place on April 23.

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KATU-TV(PORTLAND) -- An Oregon high school coach is being hailed as a hero after students say he disarmed a man with a gun in the middle of the school day.

Portland police have a suspect in custody after the gun scare at Parkrose High School in Northeast Portland on Friday.

Authorities said that shortly before noon the suspect brought a gun onto the campus, where  One staffer wrestled the suspect to the ground near the school's tennis courts and disarmed him, police said.

Students told ABC affiliate KATU-TV that the staffer was Keanon Lowe, the school's football and track and field coach, who was formerly a star wide receiver with the University of Oregon Ducks.

"He's a hero," one student told KATU.

Portland police arrived within minutes of the incident and began a room-by-room search of the school accompanied by a full evacuation.

Students were bused from the school to a nearby rendezvous point to be picked up by their parents.

In a tweet, Portland Police officials said, "We ask for patience at Parkrose High School. ... No injuries found at this time."

"This was a best-case scenario," said Portland Police Sergeant Brad Yakots. "The staff members from all accounts did an excellent job."

Police said they had recovered the weapon and that the investigation into the suspect's identity was ongoing.

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Mani Albrecht/U.S. Customs and Border Protection via Getty Image(MIAMI) -- Citing a massive influx of refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border, federal officials said Friday they are looking at moving migrant families to other cities across the nation to process and release them.

The extraordinary move has prompted serious concerns in local communities like South Florida, where officials there say they don’t have the ability to handle hundreds of migrants at a time. An official from U.S. Customs and Border Protection told reporters on Friday that there are no plans currently to fly migrants to Florida, but it was one of many locations identified as a possible location where migrant families could be processed if needed.

“This is an emergency,” the official said. “The entire system is overwhelmed, and we are simply trying to safely get them out of our custody as quickly as possible

Local officials in Florida were shocked this week when federal authorities informed them of plans to bring hundreds of undocumented migrants from the border to southern parts of the state. As many as a thousand migrants a month would be transported and split between Palm Beach and Broward County, Florida, in the coming weeks.

The move is in response to overwhelmed border operations, as groups of a hundred or more refugees are arriving at one time. Under U.S. and international law, the migrants have the right to claim asylum and plead their case to a judge. But the immigration courts are overwhelmed, and officials say they are struggling just to process so many people at a time.

Some 109,000 undocumented migrants were stopped at the border in April alone.

The Department of Homeland Security did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Last week, the Washington Post reported authorities would start transporting migrants between border stations in Texas by plane from areas overwhelmed by migrant crossings. The latest plans for Florida are the first indication that Customs and Border Protections will start transporting migrants to areas outside border states.

After hearing the news, officials in Broward County began working quickly to alert local nonprofits, shelters and businesses about the new arrivals.

“This is a humanitarian crisis,” Broward Mayor Mark Bogen said in a statement Friday. “We will do everything possible to help these people. If the President will not provide us with financial assistance to house and feed these people, he will be creating a homeless encampment.”

The migrants would be processed at local CBP offices in Broward and Palm Beach counties before they’re released. But a Broward County official said local authorities weren’t told why their community was selected to receive the migrants.

“It took everyone by surprise,” said Kimberly Maroe, the county’s public information manager.

CBP does have migrant processing facilities in Southern Florida, typically used for those who arrive by boat. Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw said the county has plans for handling mass migration, but they’re designed to direct migrants towards CBP for processing, not the other way around.

“We spent a lot of time making sure people don't come in to South Florida illegally,” Bradshaw told reporters Thursday. “Well, guess what? The federal government now is bringing people that have come into the country illegally to us that have come over out in El Paso. And I don't think it's right.”

Sen. Marco Rubio sent a letter to the Department of Homeland Security with several questions about the agency’s plans for transporting migrants to the state. The list of basic question like, "Does the Department intend to transport migrants currently in custody at the southern border to states that do not share a land border with Mexico?" and "If so, why?" appear to indicate that Homeland Security officials have not offered details on the transport plans to the Senator's office.

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iStock/DenisTangneyJr(COLUMBUS, OH) -- An investigation has determined that Ohio State University officials ignored nearly two decades of accusations of sexual abuse against a long-time university doctor, according to an independent report released Friday by the university.

Dr. Richard Strauss, an Ohio State team doctor and sports medicine researcher, is accused of sexually abusing at least 177 men over an 18-year period from 1979 to 1997, nearly his entire time at Ohio State, according to the report.

Strauss killed himself in 2005 at age 67, seven years after retiring from the university.

The accusations of abuse involved athletes from at least 16 sports including wrestling, hockey and swimming, and included Strauss' work at the student health center and an off-campus clinic that he founded late in his tenure, according to the report.

"As early as 1979, personnel in the University's Sports Medicine program and Athletics Department were aware that Strauss was conducting genital examinations on male athletes that were unusually prolonged," the report said. "Despite the persistence, seriousness, and regularity of such complaints, no meaningful action was taken by the University until January 1996."

Other complaints against Strauss allege that he fondled male students to the point of sexual arousal and showered alongside male students at the campus athletics facility.

The university removed Strauss as a school physician in 1996 after a flurry of student complaints, and reported his actions to the State Medical Board of Ohio. However the school allowed Strauss to retain his tenured faculty position while he operated an off-campus clinic, where the report says he continued to abuse students.

The university also failed to report Strauss’ conduct to law enforcement, and allowed Strauss to voluntarily retire in 1998 with emeritus status, the report said.

In 2018 school officials retained the law firm of Perkins Coie LLP to conduct an independent investigation that ultimately involved interviews with more than 200 former students and university staff, including more than 100 former students who reported firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct committed by Strauss.

Strauss' accusers allege that more than 20 school officials and staff members were aware of complaints against Strauss during his employment with the university.

"The findings are shocking and painful to comprehend," Ohio State President Michael Drake said Friday in a letter to students and faculty. "Our institution’s fundamental failure at the time to prevent this abuse was unacceptable."

Drake said the university has implemented a series of safeguards against sexual misconduct in the 20 years since Strauss retired and the school is covering the cost of professionally certified counseling for those who were affected by Strauss.

The school has also begun the process of revoking the faculty emeritus status that Straus received in 1998, Drake said.

The release of the report on Friday comes a day after lawyers for victims of former sports doctor Larry Nassar said they were seeking additional reparations from Michigan State University in compensation for Nassar's sexual abuse of hundreds of girls and women while he worked for Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics.

Like Strauss, Nassar stands accused of abusing scores of athletes during his time at a major university. Michigan State recently agreed to a $500 million settlement with his accusers and Nassar is serving life in prison for his actions.

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Cadet Hallie H. Pound/U.S. Army(NEW YORK) -- Thirty-four African American women are expected to graduate from West Point next weekend — the highest number of black women to graduate in the same class in the history of the military academy.

A photo of the historic class of 2019 circulated on social media this week as students finish up their final exams.

“My hope when young Black girls see these photos is that they understand that regardless of what life presents you, you have the ability and fortitude to be a force to be reckoned with,” cadet Tiffany Welch-Baker told the website Because of Them We Can.

 West Point was founded in 1802 and, according to the National Park Service, graduated its first African American cadet in 1877. The first class that included women graduated more than a century later, in 1980. Last year, Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams was appointed as West Point’s first African American superintendent, CNN reported.

This year’s class will also include the highest number of Hispanic graduates and the institution’s 5,000th female graduate, according to ABC affiliate WABC-TV.

Simone Askew made history in 2017 as the first African American woman to lead the walk-on of the Cadet Corps before that year’s Army-Navy game. Askew’s mother told ABC at the time that watching the Army-Navy game as a child inspired her to attend a military academy.

In 2016, a group of 16 African American women about to graduate from West Point stirred controversy when a photo of them with raised fists surfaced. The military academy opened an investigation into whether or not the students violated the army’s rules on political expression, and later decided to take no punitive action against them.

Vice President Mike Pence will speak at this year’s graduation ceremony, his second visit to the institution.

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iStock/fstop123(NEW YORK) -- It has been 65 years since Brown vs. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that ruled segregated schools are unconstitutional, but a recent study reveals that black students remain segregated in classrooms and schools across the country.

The study by the University of California, Los Angeles' The Civil Rights Project and Penn State University's Center for Education and Civil Rights highlights that while the nation's student population has grown more diverse, in the past 30 years, segregation for black students has gotten worse.

"There's powerful research that shows that the Supreme Court was right, segregated schools are unequal for many reasons and we’re not making progress," Gary Orfield, a professor at UCLA and the co-director of the Civil Rights Project, told ABC News. Orfield said his group has been studying segregation since the project was created more than two decades ago.

"We've been going backward ever since the early 1990's when the Supreme Court changed directions and allowed the disillusion of desegregation plans. We really don't have a strategy in place to deal with this issue even though we're now a country with no racial majority in our public schools," he said.

“We’ve lost this dream,” Orfield later said, adding that "we’ve tried everything else to make separate schools equal like spending hundreds of billions of dollars on high-poverty schools through Title I.”

“It hasn’t worked and it hasn’t worked because these schools are not just segregated by race, they’re segregated by race, poverty, teacher quality, curriculum, many, many dimensions that perpetuate inequality. We know how to do better but we have almost no leadership trying to do it. Almost zero.”

According to the study, the high point for desegregation for black students was in 1988.

“By 2016, 40% of all black students were in schools with 90% or more students of color. Segregation for black students has expanded in all regions of the country, except for the Midwest,” the report findings said.

Additionally, in the South, “the percentage of black students attending intensely segregated schools has increased by 12 percentage points, more than any other region,” since 1988, according to the report’s key findings.

“We believe this is a very serious problem since we’re a country that’s very polarized by race as we know from our last election and what’s been going on ever since,” Orfield said.

“We’re polarized, it’s unequal, and changing. So, there won’t be any racial majority in our country and school integration is the only major tool that we have to deal with this issue,” he said.

New York has the highest levels of segregation for black students in the nation, according to the report, with "65% of African American students in intensely segregated minority schools." Additionally, California is the most segregated for Latino students, "where 58% attend intensely segregated schools, and the typical Latino student is in a school with only 15% white classmates."

“Segregation impacts every single person,” said Matt Gonzales, the director of the School Diversity Project for New York Appleseed – a social justice organization.

Gonzales told ABC News in a phone interview that the effects of segregation go beyond schools and students, adding that the issue is really about... "the democratic nature of our country and of our public institutions."

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