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(KNOXVILLE, Tenn.) -- One person is dead and a police officer injured after an officer-involved shooting at a high school in Knoxville, Tennessee, police reported Monday.

Knoxville Police Department officers responded to Austin-East Magnet High School in northeast Knoxville after reports of a male subject who was "possibly armed in the school," police said.

When officers arrived, they found the unidentified suspect, who was a student at the school, in a bathroom and ordered him out, but he refused to comply, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, which is overseeing the investigation.

"As officers entered the restroom, the subject reportedly fired shots, striking an officer," TBI said in a statement.

"The student hadn't done anything with the firearm until the officers engaged," TBI director David Rausch said in a news conference Monday evening.

One officer returned fire, striking the suspect, the TBI said. The suspect was pronounced dead at the scene, Rausch told reporters.

The wounded officer was shot at least once and was transported to the UT Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries.

The officer who was shot is in "good spirits" and said he'd "rather this happen to him than someone else," Knoxville Mayor Indya Kincannon told ABC affiliate WATE-TV in Knoxville after visiting the officer's bedside at the hospital.

There are no other known gunshot victims, according to Rausch.

Although one person was detained for questioning, Rausch said as of Monday night there were no arrests.

Several agencies, including the Nashville field division of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, were on the scene to help with the investigation.

Knox County Schools Superintendent Bob Thomas said in a tweet the school has been "secured" and that the students "who were not involved in the incident have been released to their families." Authorities are still gathering more information about the "tragic situation," he said.

Rausch said investigators are going through surveillance camera footage to get more information on the incident. He added that the officers were wearing body cameras.

"It's a sad day," he said. "These are the days you don't want to get this phone call."

Investigators didn't immediately reveal what type of gun the suspect used.

The investigation is ongoing.

Gun laws in Tennessee have been in the spotlight after Gov. Bill Lee signed a bill last week that would allow most adults 21 and older to carry handguns -- either open carry or concealed carry -- without a permit, background check or training.

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(BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn.) -- A police officer who shot and killed a driver during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, on Sunday afternoon, meant to deploy her Taser instead of her gun, police said.

In a press conference on Monday, Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon says he believes the female officer intended to deploy her Taser when she "accidentally" shot 20-year-old Daunte Wright.

The incident unfolded around 2 p.m. local time, when officers initiated a stop for an expired registration tag on a vehicle in the city in Minnesota's Hennepin County, about 10 miles northwest of Minneapolis. During the traffic stop, the officers determined that the driver of the vehicle had an outstanding gross misdemeanor warrant, according to Gannon.

"At one point as officers were attempting to take the driver into custody, the driver re-entered the vehicle," Gannon said in a statement Sunday. "One officer discharged their firearm, striking the driver."

At the press conference on Monday, the Brooklyn Center Police Department released body camera footage of the incident. Gannon said the officer can be heard warning Wright and her fellow officers that she will be deploying her Taser.

"However, the officer drew their handgun instead of their Taser," Gannon said. "It is my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their Taser, but instead shot Mr. Wright with a single bullet. This appears to me, from what I viewed and the officer's reaction and distress immediately after, that this was an accidental discharge that resulted in the tragic death of Mr. Wright."

The officer can be heard yelling, "Holy s---, I just shot him," in the body camera footage.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is investigating the incident.

The officer, who has not been identified, is now on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation, Gannon said, identifying her as a "very senior officer."

The car traveled several blocks before crashing into another vehicle. The passengers in the other car were not injured, according to Gannon.

Officers and medical personnel "attempted life saving measures" on Wright, Gannon said, but he died at the scene.

A female passenger who was also in the vehicle with Wright sustained non-life-threatening injuries during the crash, according to Gannon. She was transported to North Memorial Health Hospital in Robbinsdale, a few miles south of Brooklyn Center.

A preliminary report issued by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's office Monday evening said Wright's death was a homicide, as he died from a gunshot wound to the chest.

Wright's mother, Katie Wright, said she was on the phone with him before he was killed.

"I heard scuffling and I heard the police officers say, 'Daunte, don't run.' And then the other officer said, 'Put the phone down,' and hung it up," Katie Wright told reporters on Sunday. "And a minute later, I called and his girlfriend answered -- that was the passenger -- and said that he'd been shot, and she put [the phone] on the driver's side and my son was laying there lifeless."

In a statement to ABC News, Wright's family described him as a young father who "had a whole life ahead of him."

"We just want people to know Daunte was a good kid," Wright's family said in a statement. "He loved being a father to Daunte Jr."

"Daunte had a smile to make anyone's heart melt. He was definitely a jokester, he loved to joke with people, especially his brothers and sisters," the family added. "He did not deserve this."

Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump -- who has represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and more -- will represent Wright's family.

At a press conference about his death, law enforcement officials would not say how or if the officer who shot Wright would be punished, but said all Brooklyn Center employees are "entitled to due process." Brooklyn Center Mayor Mike Elliott expressed his support for the removal of the police officer that killed Wright.

"We will get to the bottom of this," Elliott said. "We will do all that is within our power to make sure that justice is done for Daunte Wright."

Earlier that day, Elliott tweeted that he was taking a phone call with President Joe Biden about the administration's support following the incident.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz also held a press conference to acknowledge the grieving that is taking place in the state as the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minnesota officer charged in the death of George Floyd, continues. Floyd's death in Minneapolis in May 2020 prompted nationwide protests.

"We can either come together and fix this, or we can suffer together as fools, and we can continue to make this happen," Walz said. "Our time was made clear last May, in Minnesota, our time to get one shot at fixing that was there. And in the midst of this trial that the world's watching the situation repeated itself yesterday."

Moments after the deadly shooting, dozens of protesters holding Black Lives Matter signs gathered at the scene.

John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said there were around 100 people at the scene who were "highly agitated" when investigators from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension responded. The crowd was asked to disperse and did so shortly thereafter, as more agencies arrived on scene to coordinate a response to the protesters.

Later, crowds of 100 to 200 people marched toward the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters, according to Harrington.

"We saw rocks and other objects thrown at the police department. There were reports of shots fired in the area of the police department," Harrington said at a press conference late Sunday night. "Within hours of that, a secondary group we heard was at the Shingle Creek mall or business center and we have reports of approximately 20 businesses that were broken into during that period."

Authorities declared the demonstration outside the police department an unlawful assembly and gave the crowds a 10-minute warning to clear out. Aerial footage obtained by ABC News shows police forming a perimeter around the building.

About 25 minutes later, officers started firing rubber bullets and flash bangs to disperse protesters remaining in the area. No injuries have been reported, and it is unclear if any arrests have been made.

Harrington said the crowd at the police department had largely dispersed as of late Sunday night, though there were still "some pockets of individuals."

On Monday evening, the Brooklyn Center City Council voted 3-2 to give the mayor's office command authority over the police department.

"At such a tough time, this will streamline things and establish a chain of command and leadership," Elliot tweeted.

Around 5:30 p.m. local time, the mayor tweeted that the city manager was relieved of his duties and the deputy city manager took charge.

Minnesota is mobilizing its National Guard to Brooklyn Center at the request of local authorities, according to Harrington.

The National Guard is already deployed in nearby Minneapolis for the ongoing trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who died on May 25 after Chauvin was filmed kneeling on his neck as other officers stood by.

"At this time, we have essentially a full activation," Harrington said. 'You will see a robust assortment of National Guard, state and local police departments working together over the next two or three days as we once again prepare for the trial and also are prepared for any other and any further civil unrest that may come from the Brooklyn Center officer-involved shooting today."

Col. Matt Langer of the Minnesota State Patrol told reporters that the public can expect to see "a greater law enforcement presence, a greater National Guard presence" in and around Minneapolis on Monday.

Shortly after midnight, the Brooklyn Center mayor issued a citywide curfew that remained in place until 6 a.m. local time on Monday. Elliott called for calm in the community and for authorities not to use force on peaceful protesters. Walz said a regional curfew will continue on Monday night, starting at 7 p.m.

"Our entire community is filled with grief following today's officer-involved shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old young man," Elliott said in a statement. "We continue to ask that members of our community gathering do so peacefully, amid our calls for transparency and accountability."

The NBA, NHL and MLB, all announced that games scheduled for Monday night in Minnesota will be postponed due to the incident. All three of the leagues put out statements expressing their condolences to the Wright family.

Metro Transit, the main public transportation operator in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area, announced Sunday that it was shutting down public transit in Brooklyn Center at the request of law enforcement.

Biden spoke about the shooting on Monday afternoon, calling for an investigation into the "really tragic" incident.

"The question is: was it an accident? Was it intentional? That remains to be determined by a full-blown investigation," Biden said.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz also held a press conference to acknowledge the grieving that is taking place in the state as the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minnesota officer charged in the death of George Floyd, continues. Floyd's death in Minneapolis in May 2020 prompted nationwide protests.

"We can either come together and fix this, or we can suffer together as fools, and we can continue to make this happen," Walz said. "Our time was made clear last May, in Minnesota, our time to get one shot at fixing that was there. And in the midst of this trial that the world's watching the situation repeated itself yesterday."

Moments after the deadly shooting, dozens of protesters holding Black Lives Matter signs gathered at the scene.

John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said there were around 100 people at the scene who were "highly agitated" when investigators from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension responded. The crowd was asked to disperse and did so shortly thereafter, as more agencies arrived on scene to coordinate a response to the protesters.

Later, crowds of 100 to 200 people marched toward the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters, according to Harrington.

"We saw rocks and other objects thrown at the police department. There were reports of shots fired in the area of the police department," Harrington said at a press conference late Sunday night. "Within hours of that, a secondary group we heard was at the Shingle Creek mall or business center and we have reports of approximately 20 businesses that were broken into during that period."

Authorities declared the demonstration outside the police department an unlawful assembly and gave the crowds a 10-minute warning to clear out. Aerial footage obtained by ABC News shows police forming a perimeter around the building.

About 25 minutes later, officers started firing rubber bullets and flash bangs to disperse protesters remaining in the area. No injuries have been reported, and it is unclear if any arrests have been made.

Harrington said the crowd at the police department had largely dispersed as of late Sunday night, though there were still "some pockets of individuals."

On Monday evening, the Brooklyn Center City Council voted 3-2 to give the mayor's office command authority over the police department.

"At such a tough time, this will streamline things and establish a chain of command and leadership," Elliot tweeted.

Around 5:30 p.m. local time, the mayor tweeted that the city manager was relieved of his duties and the deputy city manager took charge.

Minnesota is mobilizing its National Guard to Brooklyn Center at the request of local authorities, according to Harrington.

The National Guard is already deployed in nearby Minneapolis for the ongoing trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who died on May 25 after Chauvin was filmed kneeling on his neck as other officers stood by.

"At this time, we have essentially a full activation," Harrington said. 'You will see a robust assortment of National Guard, state and local police departments working together over the next two or three days as we once again prepare for the trial and also are prepared for any other and any further civil unrest that may come from the Brooklyn Center officer-involved shooting today."

Col. Matt Langer of the Minnesota State Patrol told reporters that the public can expect to see "a greater law enforcement presence, a greater National Guard presence" in and around Minneapolis on Monday.

Shortly after midnight, the Brooklyn Center mayor issued a citywide curfew that remained in place until 6 a.m. local time on Monday. Elliott called for calm in the community and for authorities not to use force on peaceful protesters. Walz said a regional curfew will continue on Monday night, starting at 7 p.m.

"Our entire community is filled with grief following today's officer-involved shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old young man," Elliott said in a statement. "We continue to ask that members of our community gathering do so peacefully, amid our calls for transparency and accountability."

The NBA, NHL and MLB, all announced that games scheduled for Monday night in Minnesota will be postponed due to the incident. All three of the leagues put out statements expressing their condolences to the Wright family.

Metro Transit, the main public transportation operator in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area, announced Sunday that it was shutting down public transit in Brooklyn Center at the request of law enforcement.

ABC News' Alexandra. Faul, Will Gretsky, Will McDuffie, Matt Stone and Ivan Pereira contributed to this report.

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(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The jury has heard extensively about George Floyd's drug addiction, but until Monday little had been shared to humanize the man prosecutors say died in the most inhumane way.

Prosecutors winding down their murder case against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, called Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd, to the witness stand to provide what is known in Minnesota as "spark of life doctrine" testimony.

Stemming from a 1985 state Supreme Court case, Minnesota is rare in permitting such personal and often emotional testimony from loved ones of an alleged crime victim in advance of a verdict. In most states, such testimony is reserved for victim impact statements during sentencing if there is a conviction.

Prior to the start of the trial, prosecutor Matthew Frank told Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill that he planned to invoke the doctrine during the trial, allowing the prosecution to call witnesses to testify about Floyd as a brother, son, father and friend.

"This puts some personal nature back into the case for somebody who's treated so impersonally in an unfortunately biased system," Frank told Cahill.

Philonise Floyd attempted to do just that, describing his brother's upbringing in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and at the Cuney Homes public housing project in Houston. He described his brother's fondness for Nintendo video games, his prowess in playing basketball and football in high school and college, and his love for their late mother, Larcenia Floyd.

He described his brother as a "big momma's boy," who had a special relationship with their mother, who died in 2018.

"Being around him, he showed us like how to treat our mom and how to respect our mom," Philonise Floyd testified.

During one point in his testimony, Philonise Floyd was shown a photo of his brother as a child hugging their smiling mother while lying in her lap. He began to cry and paused his testimony to wipe his eyes with a tissue and compose himself. He then explained why the month of May has become so bittersweet for him.

"On May 24, I got married and my brother was killed on May 25, and my mom died on May 30. So it's like a bittersweet month because I'm supposed to be happy when that month comes," Philonise Floyd said, his voice cracking with emotion.

He said as a child, he looked up to his older brother, George, who he referred by his middle name, Perry. He said his brother was a standout athlete at Jack Yates High School in Houston, where he played basketball and football, and taught him how to play the sports.

He said his brother would always make sure he was dressed and ready for school and had lunch to take with him, adding that George Floyd often made banana mayonnaise sandwiches "because he couldn't cook."

"He just was a person everybody loved in the community. He just knew how to make people feel better," Philonise Floyd, a 39-year-old truck driver, testified.

He said that when their mother died in May 2018, George Floyd was emotionally crushed that he was in Minnesota and not at her side in Houston.

"So, that right there it hurt him a lot. When we went to the funeral, George just sat there at the casket ... and he would just say 'momma, momma' over and over again," he said, recalling the same cries his brother repeated as he was dying under the weight of Chauvin's knee on his neck.

"I didn't know what to tell him because I was in pain, too," he said. "We all were hurting and he was just kissing her and kissing her. He did not want to leave the casket."

Prior to Philonise Floyd testimony, Lee Merritt, an attorney for the Floyd family, told ABC News that Floyd's loved ones were looking forward to this portion of the trial. He said they wanted to add context to the man Chauvin's defense attorney Eric Nelson has repeatedly maligned.

Nelson has argued and questioned witnesses on whether Floyd's drug addiction and heart diseases more likely caused his death than the actions of Chauvin and three other officers involved in his fatal May 25, 2020, arrest.

"As you can imagine no one in the country is more invested in the outcome of this case than the family," Merritt told ABC News.

The "spark of life" testimony will followed a week in which the Floyd family has had to endure the most graphic testimony yet of medical experts offering a second-by-second description of Floyd's death and how his body was dissected during an autopsy.

"George Floyd has become a hashtag. He's become a rallying cry, but the family wants the jury to know that he was a person, that his life had value, that if he wasn't assaulted in the way he was, that he could have led a productive life, that family members relied on him," Merritt said. "How that evidence is going to come in is going to be very important to this family."

The "spark of life" doctrine emerged from a 1985 case in which a defendant charged with killing a police officer argued to the Minnesota Supreme Court that the prosecutor prejudiced the jury with a speech about the officer's marriage and childhood upbringing that was so emotional the judge had to order a recess.

The state Supreme Court ruled that prosecutors could present evidence that a murder victim was "not just bones and sinews covered with flesh, but was imbued with the spark of life."

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(NEW YORK) -- Missouri prosecutors charged former Kansas City Chiefs assistant coach Britt Reid with DWI on Monday in connection with the February crash that critically injured a 5-year-old, leaving her with severe traumatic brain injury.

Jackson County prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said Reid, 35, surrendered later in the day on the charge of driving while intoxicated, resulting in serious physical injury. Attorney information for Reid was not immediately available.

On Feb. 4, three days before the Chiefs played in the Super Bowl, Reid was driving his pickup truck on a highway near the team's training complex next to Arrowhead Stadium when he struck two vehicles that were stopped on the side of the highway, court documents said.

Reid, who is the son of Chiefs' head coach Andy Reid, was allegedly traveling at over 82 mph in a 65 mph zone right before the crash, the court documents said.

Ariel Young, 5, was critically injured with "life-threatening injuries" and was hospitalized. Ariel suffered "severe traumatic brain injury, a parietal fracture, brain contusions and subdural hematomas," according to prosecutors.

Her family's attorney told Good Morning America in March that she likely has permanent brain damage.

Another vehicle occupant suffered facial lacerations and a concussion, the court documents said.

Reid, who was also injured in the crash, told an officer he had two to three drinks and had taken Adderall, according to the search warrant obtained by ABC News. The officer reported smelling "a moderate odor of alcoholic beverages emanating" from Reid and that his eyes were bloodshot, according to the warrant.

Blood tests found that Reid had a blood alcohol concentration of .113, above the state's limit of .08, prosecutors said.

Reid was placed on administrative leave from the team until his contract, which the team did not renew, expired.

If convicted on the charge, Reid faces up to seven years in prison, according to court documents.

Baker's office said the prosecutor will "vigorously pursue" this charge against Reid and stated he is not receiving any "receiving any favorable treatment from Kansas City police or the Jackson County Prosecutor's Office." The office will request that Reid be held on a $100,000 bond and be placed on GPS and alcohol monitoring.

In a statement released Monday, the Kansas City Chiefs expressed their condolences to the victims.

"Our prayers are focused on Ariel’s continued healing and recovery. The Chiefs are regularly in contact with the family’s designated representative during this challenging time.”

ABC News' Meredith Deliso contributed to this report.

 

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(BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn.) -- A police officer shot and killed a driver during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, on Sunday afternoon, authorities said.

The incident unfolded around 2 p.m. local time, when officers initiated a stop for a traffic violation in the city in Minnesota's Hennepin County, about 10 miles northwest of Minneapolis. During the traffic stop, the officers determined that the driver of the vehicle had an outstanding warrant, according to Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon.

"At one point as officers were attempting to take the driver into custody, the driver re-entered the vehicle," Gannon said in a statement Sunday. "One officer discharged their firearm, striking the driver."

The car traveled several blocks before crashing into another vehicle. The passengers in the other car were not injured, according to Gannon.

Officers and medical personnel "attempted life saving measures" on the driver who was shot, Gannon said, "but the person died at the scene."

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office will release the identity of the deceased individual following a preliminary autopsy and family notification.

Gannon said the officers were wearing body cameras at the time of the shooting. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is investigating the incident.

A female passenger who was also in the vehicle with the person shot sustained non-life threatening injuries during the crash, according to Gannon. She was transported to North Memorial Health Hospital in Robbinsdale, a few miles south of Brooklyn Center.

Although authorities have not yet released the victim's identity, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and Brooklyn Center Mayor Mike Elliott have both released statements naming him as 20-year-old Daunte Wright.

Wright's mother, Katie Wright, also confirmed that her son was the person who was fatally shot. She said she was on the phone with him before he was killed.

"I heard scuffling and I heard the police officers say, 'Daunte, don't run.' And then the other officer said, 'Put the phone down,' and hung it up," Katie Wright told reporters on Sunday. "And a minute later, I called and his girlfriend answered -- that was the passenger -- and said that he'd been shot, and she put [the phone] on the driver's side and my son was laying there lifeless."

In a statement to ABC News, Wright's family described him as a young father who "had a whole life ahead of him."

"We just want people to know Daunte was a good kid," Wright's family said in a statement. "He loved being a father to Daunte Jr."

"Daunte had a smile to make anyone's heart melt. He was definitely a jokester, he loved to joke with people, especially his brothers and sisters," the family added. "He did not deserve this."

Moments after the deadly shooting, dozens of protesters holding Black Lives Matter signs gathered at the scene.

John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said there were around 100 people at the scene who were "highly agitated" when investigators from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension responded. The crowd was asked to disperse and did so shortly thereafter, as more agencies arrived on scene to coordinate a response to the protesters.

Later, crowds of 100 to 200 people marched toward the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters, according to Harrington.

"We saw rocks and other objects thrown at the police department. There were reports of shots fired in the area of the police department," Harrington said at a press conference late Sunday night. "Within hours of that, a secondary group we heard was at the Shingle Creek mall or business center and we have reports of approximately 20 businesses that were broken into during that period."

Authorities declared the demonstration outside the police department an unlawful assembly and gave the crowds a 10-minute warning to clear out. Aerial footage obtained by ABC News shows police forming a perimeter around the building.

About 25 minutes later, officers started firing rubber bullets and flash bangs to disperse protesters remaining in the area. No injuries have been reported, and it is unclear if any arrests have been made.

Harrington said the crowd at the police department had largely dispersed as of late Sunday night, though there were still "some pockets of individuals."

Minnesota is mobilizing its National Guard to Brooklyn Center at the request of local authorities, according to Harrington.

The National Guard is already deployed in nearby Minneapolis for the ongoing trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who died on May 25 after Chauvin was filmed kneeling on his neck as other officers stood by.

"At this time, we have essentially a full activation," Harrington said. "You will see a robust assortment of National Guard, state and local police departments working together over the next two or three days as we once again prepare for the trial and also are prepared for any other and any further civil unrest that may come from the Brooklyn Center officer-involved shooting today."

Col. Matt Langer of the Minnesota State Patrol told reporters that the public can expect to see "a greater law enforcement presence, a greater National Guard presence" in and around Minneapolis on Monday.

Shortly after midnight, the Brooklyn Center mayor issued a citywide curfew that will remain in place until 6 a.m. local time on Monday. Elliot called for calm in the community and for authorities not to use force on peaceful protesters

“Our entire community is filled with grief following today’s officer-involved shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20 year-old young man," Elliot said in a statement. "We continue to ask that members of our community gathering do so peacefully, amid our calls for transparency and accountability.”

Minnesota's governor will hold a press conference Monday morning to address the shooting and civil unrest, according to his office.

"I am closely monitoring the situation in Brooklyn Center," Walz wrote on Twitter Sunday night. "Gwen and I are praying for Daunte Wright's family as our state mourns another life of a Black man taken by law enforcement."

Metro Transit, the main public transportation operator in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area, announced Sunday that it was shutting down public transit in Brooklyn Center at the request of law enforcement.

Brooklyn Center Community Schools announced that schools will be closed Monday due to the civil unrest, but classes will be held virtually.

"All students in grades E-12 will be in distance learning on Monday, April 12. Our school buildings will also be closed for the day. All programs, including Centaur Plus and Centaur Beginnings, and all after-school activities are also canceled," Carly Baker, superintendent of Brooklyn Center Community Schools, said in a statement Sunday. "This decision is being made out of an abundance of caution following the officer-involved shooting that took place in Brooklyn Center earlier today and not knowing what will unfold overnight in our community."

Baker added that she hasn't "entirely processed the tragedy that took place in our community" and is therefore prioritizing the safety and wellbeing of the students, their families, the staff members and the community members. On Monday, school staff will be focused on helping students cope with the "trauma" from the shooting, according to Baker.

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(NORMAN, Okla.) -- An employee at a Goodwill in Norman, Oklahoma, recently found a big surprise at work.

Andrea Lessing was sorting through a box of donations when she felt something in between some sweaters: Stacks of money that amounted to a total of $42,000.

"It was definitely shocking," she told "Good Morning America," adding that finding money isn't entirely unusual.

Lessing alerted her supervisor and through documentation of the donation, they were able to locate the rightful owner and return it.

The decision to return the money was a no-brainer, though Lessing admitted she felt the pull of human nature.

"Don't get me wrong, I'm human. Naturally the thought crosses your mind like 'I just found $42,000, I could get this, this, and this,'" she said.

Ultimately, the importance of being a good role model for her 6-year-old daughter is what pushed Lessing to do the right thing. She's trying to instill in her daughter the value of honesty and compassion for others.

"I can't tell my daughter 'you need to make good choices' as I myself am not making good choices," she said.

Lessing's altruism was rewarded; the owner gave her $1,000 as a token of gratitude.

"I actually was very surprised," she said of her initial reaction to receiving the money. "I didn't give it back to expect a reward. I didn't give it back to expect anything. I didn't expect to be on the news. I didn't expect for any of this to reach all the way over to different states and different countries. I just wanted to do the right thing."

She said she's a big believer in karma and that while a good deed may not come back right away, eventually it does.

As for what Lessing plans on doing with the money? She said she intends on taking care of bills and treating her daughter to something nice.

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(NORFOLK, Va.) -- Two Virginia police officers have been sued for allegedly drawing their guns on a uniformed Army officer during a traffic stop and spraying him with a substance. One of them has since been terminated.

On Dec. 5, 2020, Windsor police officers Joe Gutierrez and Daniel Crocker pulled over U.S. Army 2nd Lt. Caron Nazario, who is Black and Latino, while he was dressed in uniform, according to the lawsuit filed April 2.

They pulled him over in a newly purchased Chevrolet Tahoe SUV for not having a rear license plate, according to the lawsuit. Nazario was returning home from his duty station at the time, the lawsuit said.

The suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for Eastern Virginia in Norfolk, claims the officers violated Nazario's constitutional rights and seeks compensatory and punitive damages.

Police body camera footage shows the moment officers pursued Nazario, who then pulled over at a well-lit gas station.

According to the report Officer Crocker submitted after the incident, Crocker said the driver was "eluding police" and he considered it to be a high-risk traffic stop.

Nazario wasn't eluding police, he was trying to stop in a well-lit area for his safety and for the officers' safety, according to the lawsuit.

Gutierrez acknowledged that Nazario's decision to drive to a lighted area occurs "a lot ... 80% of the time," and that the maneuver informed him that Nazario was "at least 80% probability, a minority," the lawsuit claims.

The vehicle was so new Nazario hadn't yet gotten permanent plates, but had his cardboard temporary plates taped inside the rear window of the vehicle. When officers reached inside his car, that plate was visible in the rear, the lawsuit stated.

In the video footage, officers shout at Nazario to put his arms out of the window and approach him with their guns drawn.

"I'm honestly afraid to get out of the car," Nazario is heard saying in the footage.

"Yeah you should be," one officer replied.

The officers then threaten to arrest him for not listening to their orders to get out of the car and for "obstruction of justice," the video shows.

"I'm actively serving this country and this is how you're going to treat me?" Nazario says.

Seconds later, an officer appears to spray him in his face with a substance in the video.

Nazario kept his hands up in the air as the officers yelled at him to get out and he shut his eyes, visibly reeling from the spray.

"I don't even want to reach for my seatbelt, can you please? ... My hands are out, can you please -- look, this is really messed up," Nazario says.

The officers are heard shouting conflicting orders at him, telling him to put his hands out of the window while telling him to open the door and get out.

At one point, Gutierrez told Nazario he was "fixin' to ride the lightning," according to the lawsuit. The phrase was a line from the movie The Green Mile, a film about a Black man facing execution, and references the electric chair, the lawsuit states.

When he finally got out of the car the video shows the officers repeatedly telling Nazario to get on the ground and then force him down, according to the lawsuit.

The officers struck Nazaro with their fists, knees and hands, forcing him onto his face and placed him in handcuffs, according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit claims the officers used this force despite not having any probable cause to believe Nazario had committed a crime. Nazario was not charged in the incident.

"These cameras captured footage of behavior consistent with a disgusting nationwide trend of law enforcement officers, who, believing they can operate with complete impunity, engage in unprofessional, discourteous, racially biased, dangerous and sometimes deadly abuses of authority ..." the lawsuit said.

Gutierrez wrote in his report that he felt he had to choose between charging Nazario with obstruction or releasing him without any charges.

"I made the decision to release him without any charges," his report said, according to The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk . "The reason for this decision is simple; the military is the only place where double jeopardy applies. Meaning that whatever happened in civil court, the military could still take action against him. Being a military veteran, I did not want to see his career ruined over one erroneous decision."

Crocker said in his report he chose against filing charges because Nazario was active duty military and didn't want to see his career ruined for "poor judgement."

Crocker still works for the department, according to The Virginian-Pilot. Officer Gutierrez has since been terminated, according to a statement released Sunday evening by the town of Windsor.

Windsor is located about 70 miles southeast of Richmond.

The Windsor Police Department did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.

On Sunday, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam issued a statement calling the incident "disturbing" and saying that it angered him. He directed the state police to conduct an independent investigation.

"Our Commonwealth has done important work on police reform, but we must keep working to ensure Virginians are safe during interactions with police, the enforcement of laws is fair and equitable, and people are held accountable," Northam said in the statement.

The Virginia State Police have opened a criminal investigation into the incident, they confirmed on Twitter Sunday. In a statement released earlier Sunday, the governor and town of Windsor requested an investigation.

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ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Deadly and damaging storms moved through the South over the weekend from Texas to North Carolina producing 14 reported tornadoes and hundreds of damaging storm reports.

Two people are also dead due to the storm over the weekend including one man in Palmetto, Louisiana, where an EF-3 tornado with winds of 140 mph destroyed his home.

A 17-year-old girl in the Tampa Bay area also died after being electrocuted from a downed wire from a storm.

Straight line winds of 75 to 85 mph from Alabama to Florida produced significant damage to homes in the region.

Huge hail larger than golf balls covered yards in Florida and flooded private pools.

Attention now turns to a new storm moving into Texas with damaging winds and a hail threat for this evening.

This same storm system will move across the Gulf Coast with heavy rain and more thunderstorms expected over the next few days.

Some of the rain can be heavy and could produce localized flash flooding, especially from Louisiana into Mississippi.

As the South gets soaked with rain and strong thunderstorms, the northern Plains and the Rockies will get a taste of winter with snow expected Monday night through Wednesday.

Wind chills are expected to drop into the teens and even single digits in the Dakotas and Minnesota on Tuesday morning.

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(PHILADELPHIA) -- Gun violence in Philadelphia continued over the weekend after 11 people were shot in a 24-hour period, according to police.

Three people died as a result of the shootings. A 10-year-old was among those wounded, ABC Philadelphia station WPVI-TV reported.

One of the victims was a 34-year-old man who was shot in the back of the head three times and once in the chest on Saturday around 7:30 p.m. in Philadelphia's West Oak Lane neighborhood.

Several shootings have occurred in the city in recent months. Hunting Park resident Kareem Singletary told WPVI that the shootings have gotten so bad that "people are used to it happening every day."

Four people died and another 10 were wounded after several shootings last Monday, WPVI reported.

Federal officials announced Thursday they are partnering with the Philadelphia Police Department to combat the city's gun violence epidemic with an "all hands on deck" effort.

In 2020, 499 people were killed as a result of gun violence in Philadelphia -- a 40% increase from 2019, Acting U.S. Attorney Jennifer Arbittier Williams said in a statement. The city is on pace to surpass 600 shooting deaths in 2021, Williams said, describing it as a "horrible milestone."

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Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office

(BOCA RATON, Fla.) -- New York federal judge Sandra Feuerstein was killed when she was struck while walking on a sidewalk in Boca Raton, Florida, by an alleged hit-and-run driver, who also ran over a 6-year-old boy, leaving him seriously injured, according to police.

Feuerstein, 75, who was apparently vacationing in Florida, was walking on a sidewalk near the beach just after 10 a.m. on Friday when the operator of a red two-door sedan drove around stopped traffic and jumped the curb, hitting Feuerstein on the sidewalk, according to a police report of the incident obtained by ABC News.

After striking Feuerstein, the car continued on the sidewalk, hitting the child before speeding off, according to the report.

The driver kept going for another five miles before crashing in the neighboring city of Delray Beach, police said.

The suspected hit-and-run driver was identified as 23-year-old Nastasia Snape of North Lauderdale, Florida, who was arrested on suspicion of vehicular homicide, hit-and-run involving death and leaving the scene of an accident with injury.

Feuerstein was taken to Delray Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead, police said. The injured child, Anthony Ovchinnikov, was in serious condition at the hospital, according to police.

Witnesses to the hit-and-run crash provided police with a description and license plate number of the fleeing car.

About 15 minutes later, the same car was involved in the wreck in Delray Beach, according to a second police report.

Delray Beach police said Snape initially appeared to be unconscious and still behind the wheel of the red car. As officers approached the car, Snape regained consciousness and was getting out of the vehicle while apparently convulsing and exhibiting seizure-like movements, according to the report.

A police officer who first spoke to Snape, who was alone in the vehicle, said she refused to respond to questions and "stared into space," according to the report.

Once placed in an ambulance, Snape "began to scream and fight with paramedics, stating that she was 'Harry Potter,'" according to the report. Paramedics gave Snape 400 milligrams of the anesthetic ketamine in an attempt to calm her down, police said.

Snape was also taken to Delray Beach Medical Center, where an officer attempted to speak with her, according to the police report. Police said she denied being involved in an earlier hit-and-run incident in Boca Raton.

After searching her car and finding several small containers labeled "THC Cannabis" and the synthetic designer drug called T salts, police obtained a warrant to test her blood, according to the report. Results of the toxicological tests are pending.

Snape was booked at the Palm Beach County Jail, where she was being held Sunday on a $20,000 bond, according to online jail records.

A longtime Nassau County, New York, district court judge and New York Supreme Court justice, Feuerstein was appointed to the federal bench by former President George W. Bush in 2003 and was serving as a judge in the Eastern District of New York in Central Islip. She and her mother, Judge Annette Elstein, who died in 2020, made history as the first mother and daughter in the United States to serve as judges at the same time.

At the time of her death, Feuerstein was presiding over a high-profile murder-for-hire case in which a former New York Police Department officer is accused of hiring a hitman to kill her estranged husband. It's unclear how Feuerstein's death will impact the case.

Mark Lesko, the acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, issued a statement expressing condolences to Feuerstein's family.

"As we mourn her tragic death," Lesko said, "we also remember Judge Feuerstein's unwavering commitment to justice and service to the people of our district and our nation."

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ABC News

(NEW YORK) — Since Friday, there have been at least 350 reports of severe weather across the southern U.S.

This includes five reported tornadoes -- one in Louisiana, two in Mississippi, one in Florida and one in Georgia.

In Louisiana, a confirmed EF-3 tornado with winds up to 140 mph touched down near Palmetto. The tornado was on the ground for over eight miles and killed one person while injuring seven others.

In Panama City Beach, a waterspout moving ashore did widespread damage to structures, trees and power lines.

In Orange Beach, Alabama, hail up to 4 inches in diameter was reported which is the size of a softball.

This is only the second time on record hail of that size has been reported in that region and it is the largest hail ever recorded in Baldwin County, Alabama.

Also along the Gulf Coast, wind gusts reach over 80 mph in spots downed trees and power lines.

Strong winds also did damage in Manatee County, Florida, and it remains unclear if damage in the county was caused by a tornado or straight lined winds.

Today will be the last day of the severe weather outbreak, however, and severe storms will race across Florida bringing damaging winds, large hail and brief tornadoes as very heavy rainfall is possible and flash flooding will be a concern.

The severe risk region stretches from Orlando to Miami and could affect over 12 million Americans.

A separate part of the same storm that is sparking the severe weather will move into the Northeast as well on Sunday.

Heavy rain will develop along a frontal boundary and bring some downpours as well as gusty winds as the rain lingers into Monday.

Locally, 1 to 2 inches of rain is possible across parts of the Northeast and some flooding could be possible.

Some parts of the Northeast, including parts of upstate New York and northwest Pennsylvania could use the rainfall as some of this region is experiencing drought.

Behind this system attention then turns to the Central U.S. where colder air will begin to spill down from Canada.

Temperatures are expected to drop up to 20 degrees below average and, by Tuesday morning, wind chills across the region will be in the 20s and teens -- one last gasp of winter as we head into mid-April.

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(HONOLULU) — A man who barricaded himself in a Honolulu hotel room after allegedly firing multiple shots has died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, officials said.

Honolulu Police Department Captain Brian Lynch said that a 911 call came in at approximately 5:40 p.m. Saturday reporting that multiple shots had been fired at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, according to ABC News’ Honolulu affiliate KITV-TV.

According to KITV, Lynch said that there were about five shots fired from a guest’s room on the fourth floor of the hotel and that hotel security responded as the suspect reportedly shot through the door of the room.

Lynch said that 18 police officers responded to the scene and immediately evacuated the adjoining rooms and all guests who were on the fourth floor of the Kahala Hotel & Resort.

Guests and staff in other areas on the property were asked to shelter-in-place. There have been no injuries reported but social media posts show hundreds of people in the resort’s grand ballroom, according to KITV.

The Kahala Hotel & Resort released a statement regarding the ongoing situation on the property.

“This evening, an individual with a firearm barricaded himself in one of the guest rooms at The Kahala,” read the statement obtained by KITV. “Our security personnel and law enforcement have evacuated guests and employees from the immediate area and everyone is sheltering in place. We ask that the public refrain from entering the area surrounding the hotel at this time. We will provide further updates as they become available.”

Lynch has confirmed that the male suspect involved with the ongoing situation is alone in the room and he may have family staying with him but says they are in a safe place.

KITV reports that the suspect is believed to be in the military and maybe stationed on Oahu.

Lynch says “it's a waiting game,” as police negotiators are currently in communication with the man as the standoff continues.

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LSU Police Department

(BATON ROUGE, La.) — Authorities and volunteers are searching for a missing Louisiana State University student whose car was found abandoned on a Mississippi River bridge in Baton Rouge earlier this week.

Kori Gauthier, an 18-year-old freshman at LSU, was last seen Tuesday, her family said.

Officers found her car after midnight Thursday on the eastbound side of the Horace Wilkinson Bridge on Interstate 10 after someone crashed into it, police said. Her car was left unoccupied on the bridge, which is about 2 miles from the university campus, for at least an hour before the crash, Baton Rouge ABC affiliate WBRZ reported.

"At this time, based on evidence collected during the investigation thus far, law enforcement officials suspect that no criminal activity or foul play took place," LSU said in a statement Saturday night.

Her father, Levar Gauthier, said they only found out Kori was missing when she didn't show up to an orthodontist appointment or dance class on Wednesday. Her daughter's former roommate used a tracking app on her phone to pinpoint Kori's car sitting at a tow lot. He said police did not contact them before or after towing her car away even though the driver was nowhere to be found following the crash.

Her keys, phone and wallet were all found inside the car, according to her parents.

"A fool would've contacted somebody for additional help seeing a situation like that," her father told ABC News about his daughter's car being found empty after the crash. "I mean it's to the point now I can't be nice anymore. My daughter's still out there somewhere and I was trying to be respectful before but I'm becoming very irate now.”

Search efforts have been underway in the days since her car was found, including local authorities, the United Cajun Navy and volunteers. A Baton Rouge Police Department dive team has been searching the Mississippi River, WBRZ reported.

"I'm angry, I'm in pain, but I appreciate everything people are doing," Levar Gauthier said.

On Saturday evening, LSU said search efforts were continuing along the Mississippi River and a cadaver dog "alerted twice in the same area on the river," but the depth of water -- about 85 to 90 feet -- and conditions made further search efforts in the area impossible.

The search effort was expected to resume in the area on Sunday with sonar equipment.

On Friday, over 300 people were involved in the search, according to the United Cajun Navy, which has been employing volunteers on foot, horseback, all-terrain vehicles, drones, boats and helicopters.

The search resumed early Saturday morning, as the community prayed for Kori Gauthier to be found safe.

Her father said he doesn't believe his daughter died by suicide and said she loved college, was moving into a new apartment and was very close to her family.

"It is very far-fetched for me to think that for some reason my daughter just slammed on her brakes, walked out of her car and went off the side of a bridge. No, not believing that," he told ABC News.

Those who knew Kori spoke of the joy she brought to her family and friends.

"She's a fun-loving girl. Loves being a college student," Levar Gauthier told WBRZ. "I hope and pray that she's just somewhere injured, and just, it's taking us a while to get to her, so she can live her dream and graduate from LSU and become a teacher and open her own dance studio."

"If you find her, just bring her home so we can make that a reality," he added.

The LSU Police Department is investigating Kori Gauthier's disappearance.

"We want to assure the LSU community that the search for missing LSU student Kori Gauthier continues in cooperation with law enforcement officials and volunteers throughout the region," the university tweeted Saturday. "LSU Police Department is in contact with Kori’s parents and keeping them updated and informed throughout, including sharing details that, out of respect for the family’s privacy and to protect the integrity of the investigation, are not being shared with the general public.”

Adania Daughtry, who was Kori's roommate in the fall and helped find her car, was among the many out searching on Saturday.

"Kori was an angel. She kept me balanced. I was blessed to meet her, for her to be my roommate," she told ABC News. "We didn't know each other before the fall, but she was an amazing person."

Spencer Gauthier is offering a $10,000 reward "to anyone that leads her home."

Kori Gauthier is 5-foot-5, weighs between 115 and 120 pounds and has dark brown hair and brown eyes. Anyone with information is asked to contact LSU Police at 225-578-3231.

ABC News' Elwyn Lopez, Nick Cirone, Nam Cho and Mark Osborne contributed to this report.

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WABC-TV

(NEW YORK) -- A man was arrested for allegedly threatening to stab an Asian undercover police officer in the face at Penn Station in New York City.

On Friday, Juvian Rodriguez, 35, approached a New York Police Department officer who was undercover as they were both on an escalator near 7th Avenue and 32nd Street entering the station, and started shouting anti-Asian statements, police said.

Rodriguez allegedly told the officer to "go back to China before you end up in the graveyard," according to local ABC station WABC. He then threatened to stab the officer in the face, WABC reported. He was arrested inside the station around 1:20 p.m. according to police.

Rodriguez is charged with harassment as a hate crime, aggravated harassment based on race or religion, menacing as a hate crime, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, according to the NYPD.

Rodriguez was freed but placed under supervised released following his arraignment, the district attorney's office told ABC News.

Hate crimes against Asian Americans have surged over the past four years. The coronavirus pandemic and its suspected origins in Wuhan, China, have been cited by advocates as one motive for the surge in anti-Asian discrimination in the United States over the last year.

From March 19, 2020, to Feb. 28, 2021, there were more than 3,795 hate incidents, including verbal harassment and physical assault, against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States reported to Stop AAPI Hate, a nonprofit organization that tracks such incidents.

The NYPD announced last month it was increasing patrols and adding undercover officers in areas with significant Asian American populations to curb crimes.

"The next person you target, whether it's through speech, menacing activity or anything else, walking along a sidewalk or on a train platform, may be a plainclothes New York City police officer. So think twice," Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said during a March 25 press conference.

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(SOUTH SALT LAKE, Utah) -- Two deputies are injured and a suspect is dead following a shooting outside a sheriff's office in South Salt Lake, Utah, authorities said.

The shooting occurred around 10:30 a.m. local time Saturday, on the north side of the property's parking lot near a bus stop, Salt Lake County Sheriff Rosie Rivera said during a press briefing.

Two deputies on the campus security team were shot and are currently hospitalized, she said. One is in stable condition after getting shot in the face, and the other is in critical condition after being shot in the eye, the sheriff said.

An Officer Involved Critical Incident team will be investigating, she said, though didn't provide any additional details about the shooting.

"Something occurred to where there were shots fired and that is all we can release at this time," she said.

"These incidents are devastating for the department, and we hope and pray the deputies will be OK," she added.

The sheriff's office is located near the Salt Lake County Metro Jail, which is on lockdown following the shooting.

"It'll be on lockdown until we feel it's secure," Rivera said. "The jail is not in danger but that is our protocol."

ABC News' Sarah Hermina contributed to this report.

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